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Become A Surface Grinder

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Working As A Surface Grinder

  • Getting Information
  • Controlling Machines and Processes
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates
  • Handling and Moving Objects
  • Unpleasant/Hazardous Environment

  • $37,410

    Average Salary

Example Of What A Surface Grinder does

  • Used Mill, MIG and TIG welding, Surface grinder and all other power tools necessary.
  • Trained to Surface grind and wet grind to .0002 tolerances
  • Machined A-7 and 4140 precision steel mold liners Operated Madison surface grinding machines
  • Mill, Hand Tools, etc.
  • Operated Manual Surface Grinder Used Measuring Tools Including Calipers and Micrometers Read and Followed Blueprints Machined Parts to Very Tight Tolerances
  • Grind and assemble broaching fixtures to blueprint specifications.
  • Set up and operate various Okomoto Straight line Grinders to grindtops, bottoms and sides of Kurt Vises and Vise Jaws.
  • Operate and program Agie Wire EDM for high speed progressive die industry.
  • Ground special carbide inserts and tooling.
  • Grind parts to specific tolerances using Micrometers, Calipers and Depth mics.
  • polished, and sanded aluminum castings.
  • Set up and operate rotary grinders, and Jig grinder.
  • Obtained job sheet identified part and size.
  • Set up and operate Haas Mill VF1.
  • drill press, bridge port Blue Print Reading
  • Spring 2009 Operated manual and ProtoTRAK mill, manual lathe, laser engraver/cutter, and surface grinder.
  • -Selected machine tooling to be used, utilizing knowledge of machine and production requirements.

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How To Become A Surface Grinder

There are many different ways to become a machinist or tool and die maker. Machinists train in apprenticeship programs, vocational schools, or community or technical colleges, or on the job. To become a fully trained tool and die maker takes several years of technical instruction and on-the-job training. Good math and problem-solving skills, in addition to familiarity with computer software, are important. A high school diploma or equivalent is necessary.

Education

Machinists and tool and die makers must have a high school diploma or equivalent. In high school, students should take math courses, especially trigonometry and geometry. They also should take courses in blueprint reading, metalworking, and drafting, if available.

Some advanced positions, such as those in the aircraft manufacturing industry, require the use of advanced applied calculus and physics. The increasing use of computer-controlled machinery requires machinists and tool and die makers to have experience using computers before entering a training program.

Some community colleges and technical schools have 2-year programs that train students to become machinists or tool and die makers. These programs usually teach design and blueprint reading, how to use a variety of welding and cutting tools, and the programming and function of computer numerically controlled (CNC) machines.

Training

There are multiple ways for workers to gain competency in the job as a tool or die maker. One common way is through long-term on-the-job training, which lasts 1 year or longer.

Apprenticeship programs, typically sponsored by a manufacturer, provide another way to become a machinist or tool and die maker, but they are often hard to get into. Apprentices usually have a high school diploma or equivalent, and most have taken algebra and trigonometry classes.

Apprenticeship programs often consist of paid shop training and related technical instruction lasting several years. The technical instruction typically is provided in cooperation with local community colleges and vocational–technical schools.

Apprentices usually work 40 hours per week and receive technical instruction during evenings. Trainees often begin as machine operators and gradually take on more difficult assignments. Machinists and tool and die makers must be experienced in using computers to work with CAD/CAM technology, CNC machine tools, and computerized measuring machines. Some machinists become tool and die makers.

A number of machinists and tool and die makers receive their technical training from community and technical colleges. Employees may learn this way while being employed by a manufacturer that supports the employee’s training goals and provides needed on-the-job training as well.

Even after completing a formal training program, tool and die makers still need years of experience to become highly skilled.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

To boost the skill level of machinists and tool and die makers and to create a more uniform standard of competency, a number of training facilities and colleges offer certification programs. The Skills Certification System, for example, is an industry-driven program that aims to align education pathways with career pathways. In addition, journey-level certification is available from state apprenticeship boards after completing an apprenticeship.

Completing a recognized certification program provides machinists and tool and die makers with better job opportunities and helps employers judge the abilities of new hires.

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Machinists and tool and die makers must understand highly technical blueprints, models, and specifications so that they can craft precision tools and metal parts. 

Manual dexterity. The work of machinists and tool and die makers must be highly accurate. For example, machining parts may demand accuracy to within .0001 of an inch, a level of accuracy that requires workers’ concentration and dexterity.

Math skills and computer application experience. Workers must have good math skills and be experienced using computers to work with CAD/CAM technology, CNC machine tools, and computerized measuring machines.

Mechanical skills. Machinists and tool and die makers must operate milling machines, lathes, grinders, laser and water cutting machines, wire electrical discharge machines, and other machine tools. They may also use a variety of hand tools and power tools.

Physical stamina. The ability to endure extended periods of standing and performing repetitious movements is important for machinists and tool and die makers.

Technical skills. Machinists and tool and die makers must understand computerized measuring machines and metalworking processes, such as stock removal, chip control, and heat treating and plating.

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Surface Grinder jobs

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Surface Grinder Demographics

Gender

  • Male

    92.6%
  • Female

    6.5%
  • Unknown

    0.9%

Ethnicity

  • White

    81.2%
  • Hispanic or Latino

    9.4%
  • Asian

    7.3%
  • Unknown

    1.5%
  • Black or African American

    0.6%
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Languages Spoken

  • Spanish

    40.0%
  • Polish

    20.0%
  • Arabic

    20.0%
  • French

    20.0%
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Surface Grinder

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Surface Grinder Education

Surface Grinder

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Top Skills for A Surface Grinder

ManualLatheDepthMics.0002TolerancesGrindsPartsCNCMachinesDrillPressOWNSetUPSCarbideWireEDMTIGMIGJigGrinderAluminumPrintSpecificationsAutocadHandToolsEngineCBNHaasExcessMaterial

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Top Surface Grinder Skills

  1. Manual Lathe
  2. Depth Mics
  3. .0002 Tolerances
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Spring 2009 Operated manual and ProtoTRAK mill, manual lathe, laser engraver/cutter, and surface grinder.
  • Grind parts to specific tolerances using Micrometers, Calipers and Depth mics.
  • Trained to Surface grind and wet grind to .0002 tolerances
  • Certified on surface grinder(manual and CNC), drill press and sand/bead blast.SKILLS(1.)
  • Ground special carbide inserts and tooling.

Top Surface Grinder Employers

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