Log In

Log In to Save

Sign Up to Save

Sign Up to Dismiss

or

The email and password you specified are invalid. Please, try again.

Email and password are mandatory

Forgot Password?

Don't have an account? Sign Up

reset password

Enter your email address and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Back to Log In

Become A Taker Down

Where do you want to work?

To get started, tell us where you'd like to work.
Sorry, we can't find that. Please try a different city or state.

Working As A Taker Down

  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
  • Getting Information
  • Interacting With Computers
  • Documenting/Recording Information
  • Processing Information
  • Deal with People

  • Outdoors/walking/standing

  • Repetitive

  • $60,000

    Average Salary

Example Of What A Taker Down does

  • Assisted in conducting telephone interviews for research studies using a computer-assisted telephone interviewing system.Developed strong interpersonal and communication skills.
  • Identify and report problems in obtaining valid data.
  • Explain survey objectives and procedures to interviewees, and interpret survey questions to help interviewees' comprehension.
  • Placed outbound calls to the public, persuading them to participate in surveys.
  • Evaluate and settle "flash claims" comprised of single car losses involving collision and comprehensive coverage.
  • Prepared and presented summaries and analyses of survey data for statistical information to be reviewed by supervisors.
  • Relayed messages to clients, typing, customer service, caller confidentiality, scheduled appointments.
  • Organize and store toys and materials to ensure order in activity areas.
  • Open discussion and opinions about products and on a particular issue or product
  • Assist in preparing food for children and serve meals and refreshments to children and regulate rest periods.
  • Read to children, and teach them simple painting, drawing, handicrafts, and songs.
  • Instruct children in health and personal habits such as eating, resting, and toilet habits.
  • Identify signs of emotional or developmental problems in children and bring them to parents' or guardians' attention.
  • Organize and participate in recreational activities, such as games.

Show More

Show Less

How To Become A Taker Down

Surveyors typically need a bachelor’s degree. They must be licensed before they can certify legal documents and provide surveying services to the public.

Education

Surveyors typically need a bachelor’s degree because they work with sophisticated technology and math. Some colleges and universities offer bachelor’s degree programs specifically designed to prepare students to become licensed surveyors. A bachelor’s degree in a closely related field, such as civil engineering or forestry, is sometimes acceptable as well.

Many states require individuals who want to become licensed surveyors to have a bachelor’s degree from a school accredited by ABET and approximately 4 years of work experience under a licensed surveyor. In other states, an associate’s degree in surveying, coupled with more years of work experience under a licensed surveyor, may be sufficient. Most states also have continuing education requirements.

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

Candidates with significant work experience as a survey technician can become licensed surveyors. To receive credit for this experience, candidates must work under a licensed surveyor. Many surveying technicians become licensed surveyors after working for as many as 10 years in the field of surveying. The amount of work experience required varies by state.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

All 50 states and the District of Columbia require surveyors to be licensed before they can certify legal documents that show property lines or determine proper markings on construction projects. Candidates with a bachelor’s degree must usually work for several years under the direction of a licensed surveyor in order to qualify for licensure.

Although the process of obtaining a license varies by state, the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying has a generalized process of four steps:

      • Complete the level of education required in your state
      • Pass the Fundamentals of Surveying (FS) exam
      • Gain sufficient work experience under a licensed surveyor
      • Pass the Principles and Practice of Surveying (PS) exam
Important Qualities

Communication skills. Surveyors must provide clear instructions to team members, clients, and government officials. They also must be able to receive instructions from architects and construction managers, and explain the job’s progress to developers, lawyers, financiers, and government authorities.

Detail oriented. Surveyors must work with precision and accuracy because they produce legally binding documents.

Physical stamina. Surveyors traditionally work outdoors, often in rugged terrain. They must be able to walk long distances for long periods.

Problem-solving skills. Surveyors must figure out discrepancies between documents showing property lines and current conditions on the land. If there were changes in previous years, they must discover the reason behind them and reestablish property lines.

Time-management skills. Surveyors must be able to effectively plan their time and their team members’ time on the job. This is critical when pressing deadlines exist or while working outside during winter months when daylight hours are short.

Visualization skills. Surveyors must be able to envision new buildings and altered terrain.

Show More

Show Less

Taker Down jobs

Add To My Jobs

Taker Down Typical Career Paths

Taker Down Demographics

Gender

  • Female

    61.9%
  • Male

    36.2%
  • Unknown

    1.9%

Ethnicity

  • White

    79.7%
  • Hispanic or Latino

    12.6%
  • Asian

    5.6%
  • Unknown

    1.7%
  • Black or African American

    0.5%
Show More

Languages Spoken

  • Spanish

    88.9%
  • Vietnamese

    11.1%

Taker Down

Unfortunately we don’t have enough data for this section.

Taker Down Education

Taker Down

Unfortunately we don’t have enough data for this section.

Job type you want
Full Time
Part Time
Internship
Temporary

Top Skills for A Taker Down

CommunicationSkillsSurveyTakercanvassDoorProductsDataEntryPhoneCallsResponsibilitiestakeBasicComputerSkillsOutboundCallsLossUsdaCustomerServiceSurveyDataRecreationalActivitiesPhoneSkillsPotentialClientsPersonalHabitsInternalTemperaturesServiceSkillsSurveyObjectivesActivityAreas

Show More

Top Taker Down Skills

  1. Communication Skills
  2. Survey Takercanvass Door
  3. Products
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Assisted in conducting telephone interviews for research studies using a computer-assisted telephone interviewing system.Developed strong interpersonal and communication skills.
  • Annotate data about manufactured food products
  • Initiated outbound calls to customers and assisted in obtaining incentives for participating in surveys online while accurately recording data.
  • Evaluate and settle "flash claims" comprised of single car losses involving collision and comprehensive coverage.
  • Relayed messages to clients, typing, customer service, caller confidentiality, scheduled appointments.

Top Taker Down Employers