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Working as a Tax Examiner

What Does a Tax Examiner Do

Tax examiners and collectors, and revenue agents ensure that federal, state, and local governments get their tax money from businesses and citizens. They review tax returns, conduct audits, identify taxes owed, and collect overdue tax payments.

Duties

Tax examiners and collectors, and revenue agents typically do the following:

  • Review filed tax returns to determine whether credits and deductions claimed are allowed by law
  • Contact taxpayers to address problems and to request supporting documentation
  • Conduct field audits and investigations of income tax returns to verify information or to update tax liabilities
  • Evaluate financial information, using their familiarity with accounting procedures and knowledge of changes to tax laws and regulations
  • Keep records on each case they deal with, including contacts, telephone numbers, and actions taken
  • Notify taxpayers of any overpayment or underpayment and either issue a refund or request additional payment

Tax examiners and collectors, and revenue agents are responsible for ensuring that individuals and businesses pay the taxes they owe. In addition to verifying that tax returns are filed properly, they follow up with taxpayers whose returns are questionable or who owe more money.

Different levels of government collect different types of taxes. The federal government deals primarily with personal and business income taxes. State governments collect income and sales taxes. Local governments collect sales and property taxes.

Because many states assess individual income taxes based on the taxpayer’s reported federal income, tax examiners working for the federal government report to the states any adjustments or corrections they make. State tax examiners then determine whether the adjustments affect how much the taxpayer owes the state.

Tax examiners and collectors, and revenue agents have different duties and responsibilities:

Tax examiners usually deal with the simplest tax returns—those filed by individual taxpayers who claim few deductions and those filed by small businesses. At the entry level, many tax examiners do clerical tasks, such as reviewing tax returns and entering them into a computer system for processing. Tax examiners also may contact individual taxpayers in order to resolve any outstanding problems with their returns.

Much of a tax examiner’s job involves making sure that tax credits and deductions claimed by taxpayers are lawful. If a taxpayer owes additional taxes, tax examiners adjust the total amount by assessing fees, interest, and penalties and then notify the taxpayer of the total amount owed.

Revenue agents specialize in tax-related accounting for the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and for equivalent agencies in state and local governments. Like tax examiners, they review returns for accuracy. However, revenue agents handle complicated tax returns of large businesses and corporations.

Many experienced revenue agents specialize in a particular area. For example, they may focus exclusively on multinational businesses. Regardless of their specialty, revenue agents must keep up to date with changes in the lengthy and complex tax laws and regulations.

Collectors, also called revenue officers in the IRS, deal with overdue accounts. The process of collecting an overdue payment starts with the revenue agent or tax examiner sending a report to the taxpayer. If the taxpayer makes no effort to pay, the case is assigned to a collector.

When a collector takes a case, he or she first sends a notice to the taxpayer. The collector then works with the taxpayer to settle the debt. Settlement may involve setting up a plan in which the amount owed is paid back in small amounts over time.

When delinquent taxpayers claim that they cannot pay their taxes, collectors investigate and verify these claims. Collectors research information on taxpayer mortgages or financial statements and locate taxpayer-owned items of value through third parties, such as neighbors or local departments of motor vehicles. Ultimately, collectors must decide whether the IRS should take a lien—a claim on an asset such as a bank account, real estate, or an automobile—to settle a debt. Collectors also have the authority to garnish wages—that is, take a portion of earned wages—to collect taxes owed.

How To Become a Tax Examiner

Most tax examiners and collectors, and revenue agents need a bachelor’s degree in accounting or a related field. However, the required level of education and experience varies by position and employer.

Education

Tax examiners need a bachelor’s degree in accounting or a related field, or a combination of relevant education and specialized experience in accounting, auditing, or tax compliance work. Candidates for tax examiner positions at the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) must have a bachelor’s degree or 1 year of full-time specialized experience.

Revenue agents need a bachelor’s degree in accounting, business administration, economics, or a related discipline. A combination of relevant education and full-time experience in business administration, accounting, or auditing is also qualifying. Revenue agents with the IRS must have either a bachelor’s degree or 30 semester hours of accounting coursework, along with specialized experience. Specialized experience includes work in accounting, bookkeeping, or tax analysis.

Collectors usually must have some combination of relevant college education and specialized experience. Specialized experience may include previous work as a loan officer or credit manager, or a background in collections, management, customer service, or tax compliance. A bachelor’s degree is needed for employment as a collector with the IRS; no additional experience is required, and experience may not be substituted for the degree. Employers desire degrees in business, finance, accounting, and criminal justice.

At the state and local levels, a bachelor’s degree is not always required, although related work experience is desired.

Training

Newly hired tax examiners get some formal training, which typically lasts between 1 month and 1 year. All tax examiners must keep current with changes in the tax code and enforcement procedures.

Entry-level collectors get both formal training and on-the-job training under an instructor’s guidance before working independently. Collectors also are encouraged to continue their professional education by attending meetings to exchange information about how modifications to tax laws affect collection methods.

Other Experience

Some state and local governments accept work experience as a substitute for education. In these cases, employers may hire tax examiners and revenue agents who have work experience in accounting, bookkeeping, or tax analysis. Employers may also hire collectors who have work experience in related areas, such as collections, customer service, or credit checking.

Advancement

Tax examiners, revenue agents, and collectors have different opportunities for career advancement. Tax examiners who review individual tax returns may advance to revenue agent positions, working on more complex business returns. Those with experience in supervisory or managerial roles may move to jobs that involve supervision of other examiners and revenue agents. Collectors who demonstrate leadership skills and a thorough knowledge of tax collection activities may advance to supervisory or managerial collector positions.

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Tax examiners and revenue agents must be able to identify questionable claims for credits and deductions. Ultimately, they must be able to determine, on further review of financial documentation, if the credits or deductions are lawful.

Computer skills. Tax examiners and revenue agents must be comfortable using a variety of computer programs. These programs include tax preparation and bookkeeping software used by individuals and businesses.

Detail oriented. Tax examiners and revenue agents verify the accuracy of each entry on the tax returns they review. Therefore, it is important that they pay attention to detail.

Interpersonal skills. Collectors must be comfortable dealing with people, including speaking with them during confrontational situations. When pursuing overdue accounts, collectors should be firm and composed.

Organizational skills. Tax examiners and revenue agents often work with multiple returns and a variety of financial documents. Keeping the various pieces of information organized is essential.

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Average Salary$48,643
Job Growth Rate-2%

Tax Examiner Jobs

Tax Examiner Resumes

Designing and figuring out what to include on your resume can be tough, not to mention time-consuming. That's why we put together a guide that is designed to help you craft the perfect resume for becoming a Tax Examiner. If you're needing extra inspiration, take a look through our selection of templates that are specific to your job.

Learn How To Write a Tax Examiner Resume

At Zippia, we went through countless Tax Examiner resumes and compiled some information about how best to optimize them. Here are some suggestions based on what we found, divided by the individual sections of the resume itself.

View Detailed Information

Tax Examiner Career Paths

Top Careers Before Tax Examiner

Top Careers After Tax Examiner

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Tell us your goals and we'll match you with the rights job to get there.

Average Salary for a Tax Examiner

Tax Examiners in America make an average salary of $48,643 per year or $23 per hour. The top 10 percent makes over $69,000 per year, while the bottom 10 percent under $33,000 per year.
Average Salary
$48,643

Best Paying Cities

Average Salary
Salary Range47k - 73k$60k$59,552
Salary Range46k - 74k$59k$58,919
Salary Range39k - 63k$50k$49,940
Salary Range35k - 58k$46k$45,829
Salary Range36k - 57k$46k$45,672
Salary Range35k - 56k$45k$44,577
$30k
$74k

Recently Added Salaries

Job TitleCompanyCompanyStart DateSalary
Excise Tax Examiner 1-Unclaimed Property Representative
Excise Tax Examiner 1-Unclaimed Property Representative
Washington State
Washington State
10/28/2020
10/28/2020
$37,72810/28/2020
$37,728
Tax Examiner (Miscellaneous)
Tax Examiner (Miscellaneous)
Sc Department of Public Safety
Sc Department of Public Safety
10/26/2020
10/26/2020
$27,52710/26/2020
$27,527
Fite-Fuel Tax Examiner
Fite-Fuel Tax Examiner
State of Wyoming
State of Wyoming
10/13/2020
10/13/2020
$40,86310/13/2020
$40,863
Tax Examiner
Tax Examiner
Sc Department of Public Safety
Sc Department of Public Safety
09/17/2020
09/17/2020
$27,52709/17/2020
$27,527
Tax Examiners
Tax Examiners
Manpowergroup
Manpowergroup
09/08/2020
09/08/2020
$39,65309/08/2020
$39,653
See More Recent Salaries

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Tax Examiner Demographics

Gender

female

62.5%

male

32.9%

unknown

4.6%

Ethnicity

White

60.3%

Hispanic or Latino

16.5%

Black or African American

12.5%

Foreign Languages Spoken

Spanish

68.7%

Chinese

6.0%

Mandarin

4.5%
See More Demographics

Tax Examiner Education

Degrees

Bachelors

37.4%

Associate

15.9%

Masters

15.8%

Top Colleges for Tax Examiners

1. University of Southern California

Los Angeles, CA

Tuition and fees
$56,225
Enrollment
19,548

2. Villanova University

Villanova, PA

Tuition and fees
$53,308
Enrollment
6,819

3. Bentley University

Waltham, MA

Tuition and fees
$49,880
Enrollment
4,177

4. University of Minnesota - Twin Cities

Minneapolis, MN

Tuition and fees
$14,760
Enrollment
31,451

5. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Champaign, IL

Tuition and fees
$15,094
Enrollment
32,974

6. SUNY at Albany

Albany, NY

Tuition and fees
$10,011
Enrollment
13,434

7. University of Pennsylvania

Philadelphia, PA

Tuition and fees
$55,584
Enrollment
10,764

8. Northwestern University

Evanston, IL

Tuition and fees
$54,568
Enrollment
8,451

9. Baylor University

Waco, TX

Tuition and fees
$45,542
Enrollment
14,159

10. California Polytechnic State University-San Luis Obispo

San Luis Obispo, CA

Tuition and fees
$9,816
Enrollment
21,047
See More Education Info

Entry Level Jobs For Becoming A Tax Examiner

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Full Time
Part Time
Internship
Temporary

Top Skills For a Tax Examiner

The skills section on your resume can be almost as important as the experience section, so you want it to be an accurate portrayal of what you can do. Luckily, we've found all of the skills you'll need so even if you don't have these skills yet, you know what you need to work on. Out of all the resumes we looked through, 46.0% of tax examiners listed tax compliance on their resume, but soft skills such as analytical skills and computer skills are important as well.

  • Tax Compliance, 46.0%
  • IRS, 5.3%
  • Technical Assistance, 4.8%
  • Federal Tax Laws, 4.4%
  • Revenue Service, 2.6%
  • Other Skills, 36.9%
  • See All Tax Examiner Skills

Best States For a Tax Examiner

Some places are better than others when it comes to starting a career as a tax examiner. The best states for people in this position are Maine, New Jersey, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts. Tax examiners make the most in Maine with an average salary of $64,316. Whereas in New Jersey and Rhode Island, they would average $60,490 and $59,827, respectively. While tax examiners would only make an average of $59,437 in Massachusetts, you would still make more there than in the rest of the country. We determined these as the best states based on job availability and pay. By finding the median salary, cost of living, and using the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Location Quotient, we narrowed down our list of states to these four.

1. Massachusetts

Total Tax Examiner Jobs:
50
Highest 10% Earn:
$89,000
Location Quotient:
1.26
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

2. Connecticut

Total Tax Examiner Jobs:
20
Highest 10% Earn:
$91,000
Location Quotient:
1.33
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

3. New York

Total Tax Examiner Jobs:
97
Highest 10% Earn:
$91,000
Location Quotient:
1.56
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here
View Full List

Tax Examiner Resumes

Designing and figuring out what to include on your resume can be tough, not to mention time-consuming. That's why we put together a guide that is designed to help you craft the perfect resume for becoming a tax examiner. If you're needing extra inspiration, take a look through our selection of templates that are specific to your job.

At Zippia, we went through countless tax examiner resumes and compiled some information about how best to optimize them. Here are some suggestions based on what we found, divided by the individual sections of the resume itself.

Learn How To Write a Tax Examiner Resume

At Zippia, we went through countless tax examiner resumes and compiled some information about how best to optimize them. Here are some suggestions based on what we found, divided by the individual sections of the resume itself.

View Detailed Information

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Top Tax Examiner Employers

1. Georgia Department of Economic Development
3.4
Avg. Salary: 
$44,325
Tax Examiners Hired: 
96+
2. Treasury Department
4.3
Avg. Salary: 
$43,641
Tax Examiners Hired: 
72+
3. Colorado Department of Revenue
4.4
Avg. Salary: 
$45,588
Tax Examiners Hired: 
40+
4. South Carolina Department of Transportation
4.0
Avg. Salary: 
$47,937
Tax Examiners Hired: 
16+
5. Commonwealth of Massachusetts
4.5
Avg. Salary: 
$50,328
Tax Examiners Hired: 
10+
6. Support Enforcement & Recovery
4.3
Avg. Salary: 
$45,239
Tax Examiners Hired: 
9+

Tax Examiner Videos

Recently Added Tax Examiner Jobs

Updated October 2, 2020