Teacher Cover Letter (With Examples)

Cover letters go a long way in setting you apart from the competition when you are applying for a job. It is your opportunity to introduce yourself in your own words and to explain why you believe you would be a good fit for the position you’re applying to.

While resumes list off your experience, cover letters are your chance to explain how this experience would help you in your next job.

Parts of a Cover Letter

No matter the job you have or the job you’re applying to, cover letters tend to follow the same general format. It begins with opening lines, which include your contact information, the information of the hiring manager and the company, and a formal greeting.

Then, in the body of the letter, you explain what you have that would make you the perfect candidate for the position, as well as emphasize your accomplishments and explain your experience.

Finally, the closing lines of the letter wrap things up with a grateful tone, thanking the hiring manager for their time, providing contact information, and a formal farewell.

Splitting your letter up into these three sections helps keep the task manageable and prevents it from becoming too overwhelming.

Teacher Cover Letter Opening

Your cover letter opening will probably look the same as anyone else’s, as they tend to be formulaic, and it should emulate the information to be found on an actual letter you would send through the mail, even if you are submitting your cover letter electronically.

First, the header of the document should contain your full name, your email, phone number, and any other quick-reference information, such as a LinkedIn profile.

Your letter should be in the classic Times New Roman 12 pt font, single-spaced. Your first line should be the date, formatted as Month Day, Year.

Then, start a new paragraph. In this section, you’re going to include all of the information you know about the person who will be reading your letter, typically a hiring manager or supervisor. Typically, this means you list their name, their job title, and the company’s address.

You can find the hiring manager’s name within the job listing itself. However, if it is not listed, try searching through the company’s LinkedIn to see if you can find someone with the title, “Hiring Manager.” If you cannot find the person’s name, or you are unsure, just addressing them by their title is fine.

This is a chance for you to show the company that you have done at least minimal research on them and to demonstrate some interest in the position, so include as much accurate information as you can find.

Now that you have gotten the information section out of the way, start off the actual letter itself with a formal greeting, followed by a comma. Again, use the hiring manager’s full name if you can find it.

Suppose the company seems more casual to you. In that case, just the first name can be used, but if they appear to be more traditional, use their full name and consider using a prefix, such as Mr. or Ms. If you are unsure of their gender — say their first name is Jessie or Pat, in that case, do not use a prefix.

If you still can’t decide what to address them by? Err on the side of formality, as it is better to be overly professional instead of too laid-back.

Suppose you Scoured their listing and website but still can’t find their name? Simply using “Dear Hiring Manager” is fine.

Once you have all of your information, your cover letter’s opening should look something like this:

March 16, 2021

Mr. John Doe
Hiring Manager
ABC Company
123 Main St.
Anywhere, USA 12345

Dear Mr. John Doe,

Teacher Cover Letter Body

This section is considerably more freeform than the previous one, but it still follows a general format. Begin your body paragraph by stating your intention — why are you writing this letter? Hiring managers may be hiring for multiple positions, so be sure to let them know which position you are applying to.

Also, mentioning where you found the job listing will help the hiring manager determine which job boards are producing the most results. Here is an example:

I am writing to express my interest in your Math Teacher position, as posted on Zippia.com.

You can also use this opening line to give them a bit of information about yourself or what drew you into applying. For example:

As a long-time admirer of your institution, I am excited to submit my application for the Math Teacher opening, as listed on Zippia.com.

Next, it’s time to explain to the reader why you believe you are a good candidate for this position. To begin, take a look at the job listing itself, and make note of which traits you possess that they are asking for. These will be what you want to emphasize in your body paragraphs. You can even use similar or the exact same language from the job listing itself when writing about your qualifications.

Say, for example, the job listing describes the ideal candidate as someone with one-on-one teaching skills. You could write:

I am an educator who is especially skilled with one-on-one instruction, giving each student the attention they deserve.

The objective of these paragraphs is to illustrate how you check off each of the company’s boxes, how your core values align with theirs, and how you are the candidate they are looking for.

While you can describe your winning traits in paragraph format, you can also choose to list them in bullet points. This works best for technical skills or skills that do not require a lot of explaining. For the sake of demonstrating your writing skills, however, try to keep this list short, with about four or five items total.

I would be a great addition to your team, as I have:

  • Experience conducting and teaching for standardized tests

  • Exceptional writing and communication skills

  • Abilities in personalized lesson planning

  • Expertise in teaching using technology

Next, take a moment to discuss your experience. The resume gives the general outline of what you have completed, but this is your chance to tell your story.

Speak to your accomplishments, especially those that have metrics attached.

It is far more meaningful to say, “I taught classrooms of over thirty students and maintained a passage rate of 90 percent,” rather than “I taught large classrooms, and the majority of my students passed.” Brag about your stats, as this helps the hiring manager understand the magnitude of your successes.

Talk about the most relevant jobs listed on your resume and how each of them has gained you valuable skills that will help in the position you are applying to. Stay upbeat and positive.

After you have highlighted all that you want to show to the hiring manager, write a concluding statement. Something to the effect of, “I believe my unique set of skills would make me an ideal candidate for this position with ABC Company.”

Teacher Cover Letter Closing Lines

Now that you have managed to talk about yourself in-depth, the hardest part is over. Next, it is time to wrap things up.

Thank the reader for their time and consideration. Reiterate your excitement and your hope to hear from them soon. List out your contact information one more time, and then end it with a formal farewell. “Sincerely” or “Regards.” Then add your full name.

I would love to discuss opportunities with ABC Company, and I hope to hear from you soon. To reach me, call (555) 555-5555 or email me at firstlastname@email.com. Thank you for your time and your consideration.

Sincerely,
First Name Last Name

Example of a Teacher Cover Letter

Once your letter is complete, it should look something like this:

March 16, 2021

Mr. John Doe
Hiring Manager
ABC Company
123 Main St.
Anywhere, USA 12345

Dear Mr. John Doe,

As a long-time admirer of your institution, I am excited to submit my application for the Math Teacher opening, as listed on Zippia.com. I am an experienced educator who has worked for nearly ten years in the field. I earned my bachelor’s and master’s degree in education from State University, and I have served in several districts across the county.

Because of my experience, I am highly adaptable and tailor my lesson plans for each class. I am an educator who is especially skilled with one-on-one instruction, giving each student the attention they deserve. I have taught classrooms of over thirty students and maintained a 90 percent passage rate.

I believe I would be a meaningful addition to your institution as I have:

  • Experience conducting and teaching for standardized tests

  • Exceptional writing and communication skills

  • Abilities in personalized lesson planning

  • Expertise in teaching using technology

I would love to discuss opportunities with ABC Company, and I hope to hear from you soon. To reach me, call (555) 555-5555 or email me at firstlastname@email.com. Thank you for your time and your consideration.

Sincerely,
First Name Last Name

Final Thoughts

Writing a cover letter can be terrifying, especially if you are like so many who do not enjoy talking about themselves. However, using the many templates you can find, both in Microsoft Word and Google Docs, and the extensive amount of tips and advice, there is nothing stopping you from creating a cover letter that helps you stand out from your competition.