What is a Technical Support Specialist

For a lot of people, technical support specialists are their best friends. Maybe not in a literal way, but a lot of people need support when it comes to technology. And guess what? Technical support specialists are their support system.

You're there to help answer questions, explain how certain things work and provide advice on all things technology. For the most part, you'll probably have specific technology that you'll be helping with, depending on your employer and industry. Since there are so many different industries you can work in, the level of education requirements are varied. But the good news is that you can go into almost any industry with this position. Hello, job opportunities.

There is more than meets the eye when it comes to being a technical support specialist. For example, did you know that they make an average of $29.79 an hour? That's $61,966 a year!

Between 2018 and 2028, the career is expected to grow 10% and produce 83,100 job opportunities across the U.S.

What Does a Technical Support Specialist Do

There are certain skills that many technical support specialists have in order to accomplish their responsibilities. By taking a look through resumes, we were able to narrow down the most common skills for a person in this position. We discovered that a lot of resumes listed customer-service skills, listening skills and problem-solving skills.

Learn more about what a Technical Support Specialist does

How To Become a Technical Support Specialist

If you're interested in becoming a technical support specialist, one of the first things to consider is how much education you need. We've determined that 50.4% of technical support specialists have a bachelor's degree. In terms of higher education levels, we found that 4.8% of technical support specialists have master's degrees. Even though most technical support specialists have a college degree, it's possible to become one with only a high school degree or GED.

Choosing the right major is always an important step when researching how to become a technical support specialist. When we researched the most common majors for a technical support specialist, we found that they most commonly earn bachelor's degree degrees or associate degree degrees. Other degrees that we often see on technical support specialist resumes include high school diploma degrees or master's degree degrees.

You may find that experience in other jobs will help you become a technical support specialist. In fact, many technical support specialist jobs require experience in a role such as customer service representative. Meanwhile, many technical support specialists also have previous career experience in roles such as computer technician or help desk analyst.

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Average Salary
$61,966
Average Salary
Job Growth Rate
10%
Job Growth Rate
Job Openings
138,568
Job Openings
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Technical Support Specialist Career Paths

Top Careers Before Technical Support Specialist

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Average Salary for a Technical Support Specialist

Technical Support Specialists in America make an average salary of $61,966 per year or $30 per hour. The top 10 percent makes over $91,000 per year, while the bottom 10 percent under $41,000 per year.
Average Salary
$61,966
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Technical Support Specialist Resumes

Designing and figuring out what to include on your resume can be tough, not to mention time-consuming. That's why we put together a guide that is designed to help you craft the perfect resume for becoming a Technical Support Specialist. If you're needing extra inspiration, take a look through our selection of templates that are specific to your job.

Learn How To Write a Technical Support Specialist Resume

At Zippia, we went through countless Technical Support Specialist resumes and compiled some information about how to optimize them. Here are some suggestions based on what we found, divided by the individual sections of the resume itself.

View Technical Support Specialist Resume Examples And Templates

Technical Support Specialist Demographics

Technical Support Specialist Gender Statistics

male

69.9 %

female

26.1 %

unknown

4.0 %

Technical Support Specialist Ethnicity Statistics

White

60.4 %

Hispanic or Latino

13.5 %

Asian

11.6 %

Technical Support Specialist Foreign Languages Spoken Statistics

Spanish

54.5 %

French

8.8 %

Arabic

4.5 %
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Our resume builder tool will walk you through the process of creating a stand-out Technical Support Specialist resume.

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Technical Support Specialist Education

Technical Support Specialist Majors

14.7 %

Technical Support Specialist Degrees

Bachelors

50.4 %

Associate

31.5 %

High School Diploma

6.8 %

Top Colleges for Technical Support Specialists

1. Stanford University

Stanford, CA • Private

In-State Tuition
$51,354
Enrollment
7,083

2. University of Pennsylvania

Philadelphia, PA • Private

In-State Tuition
$55,584
Enrollment
10,764

3. Northwestern University

Evanston, IL • Private

In-State Tuition
$54,568
Enrollment
8,451

4. University of Southern California

Los Angeles, CA • Private

In-State Tuition
$56,225
Enrollment
19,548

5. California State University - Bakersfield

Bakersfield, CA • Private

In-State Tuition
$7,309
Enrollment
9,142

6. SUNY at Binghamton

Vestal, NY • Private

In-State Tuition
$9,808
Enrollment
13,990

7. San Diego State University

San Diego, CA • Private

In-State Tuition
$7,488
Enrollment
30,018

8. Boston University

Boston, MA • Private

In-State Tuition
$53,948
Enrollment
17,238

9. New York University

New York, NY • Private

In-State Tuition
$51,828
Enrollment
26,339

10. Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Worcester, MA • Private

In-State Tuition
$50,530
Enrollment
4,571
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Online Courses For Technical Support Specialist That You May Like

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Top Skills For a Technical Support Specialist

The skills section on your resume can be almost as important as the experience section, so you want it to be an accurate portrayal of what you can do. Luckily, we've found all of the skills you'll need so even if you don't have these skills yet, you know what you need to work on. Out of all the resumes we looked through, 15.4% of technical support specialists listed customer service on their resume, but soft skills such as customer-service skills and listening skills are important as well.

12 Technical Support Specialist RESUME EXAMPLES

Best States For a Technical Support Specialist

Some places are better than others when it comes to starting a career as a technical support specialist. The best states for people in this position are New Jersey, California, New York, and Massachusetts. Technical support specialists make the most in New Jersey with an average salary of $68,055. Whereas in California and New York, they would average $67,482 and $62,117, respectively. While technical support specialists would only make an average of $60,387 in Massachusetts, you would still make more there than in the rest of the country. We determined these as the best states based on job availability and pay. By finding the median salary, cost of living, and using the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Location Quotient, we narrowed down our list of states to these four.

1. Nevada

Total Technical Support Specialist Jobs:
644
Highest 10% Earn:
$94,000
Location Quotient:
1.53
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

2. District of Columbia

Total Technical Support Specialist Jobs:
543
Highest 10% Earn:
$101,000
Location Quotient:
1.6
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

3. Colorado

Total Technical Support Specialist Jobs:
1,381
Highest 10% Earn:
$96,000
Location Quotient:
1.15
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here
Full List Of Best States For Technical Support Specialists

How Do Technical Support Specialist Rate Their Jobs?

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5.0

Nestor Gil TrinidadFebruary 2020

5.0

Zippia Official LogoNestor Gil TrinidadFebruary 2020

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Top Technical Support Specialist Employers

We've made finding a great employer to work for easy by doing the hard work for you. We looked into employers that employ technical support specialists and discovered their number of technical support specialist opportunities and average salary. Through our research, we concluded that Sprint was the best, especially with an average salary of $62,491. Dell follows up with an average salary of $69,646, and then comes IBM with an average of $74,420. In addition, we know most people would rather work from home. So instead of having to change careers, we identified the best employers for remote work as a technical support specialist. The employers include Medtronic, TEKsystems, and Ellie Mae

Technical Support Specialist FAQs

Do you need a degree for tech support?

No, you do not need a degree for tech support. In fact, over 49% of the IT job postings do not list a college degree as a requirement for applicants. Moreover, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, over 26% of IT workers in the United States do not hold a bachelor's degree or higher.

Just consider that Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, and Edward Snowden all launched tech careers without four-year college degrees. They are not in IT per se, but the technology industry is usually more impressed by what you can do over what degree(s) you may have.

To become tech support, at minimum, an associate degree or certification with on-the-job training. If you are interested in earning a bachelor's degree in IT, those with a degree have one in Information Technology, Computer Science, or Computer Engineering.

However, if you are not interested in pursuing the academic route, many certifications are available to you that can help you stand out from other candidates.

The most popular IT certifications:

  • CompTIA A+ (entry-level)

  • Microsoft Technology Associate (MTA) (recommended for entry-level)

  • Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert (MCSE) (recommended for entry-level)

  • Microsoft Certified Solutions Developer (MCSD (recommended for entry-level)

  • Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) (recommended for networking)

  • Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP) (recommended for networking)

  • AWS Certified Cloud Practitioner

  • Certified Cloud Security Professional (CCSP)

  • Certified Data Privacy Solutions Engineer (CDPSE)

  • Certified Data Professional (CDP)

  • Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH)

  • Certified Information Security Manager (CISM)

  • Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP)

  • Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert (CCIE)

  • Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP)

  • CompTIA (A+, Cloud+, Security+) (recommended for cloud computing)

  • VMware Certified Professional - Cloud Management and Automation (recommended for cloud computing)

  • AWS Certified Solutions Architect -- Professional (recommended for cloud computing)

  • Salesforce Certified Development Lifecycle and Deployment (recommended for cloud computing)

  • Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) (recommended for IT management)

  • Project Management Professional (recommended for IT management)

  • Certified ScrumMaster (recommended for IT management)

  • Microsoft Certified Azure Solutions Architect

  • Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate/Expert (MCSA/MCSE)

  • Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL)

  • Oracle database and MySQL administration certifications

  • Project Management Professional (PMP)

  • Salesforce Certified Development Lifecycle and Deployment Designer

Once you earn your certification(s), then the next step to finding a position in IT include;

  • Networking - Attend industry conferences in your area, link to relevant groups on LinkedIn, joining industry associations, participating in local/regional events, and reach out for informational interviews.

  • Complete an Internship - For most entry-level IT professionals, internships don't have to be at Apple or Google to be immensely valuable as a way to gain experience and build your skill sets.

  • Tailor Your Resume - A little extra work goes a long way when it comes to differentiating yourself from the competition in the eyes of potential employers.

  • Prepare For The Interview - This means doing your homework to know the organization you're applying to and the market it competes in. Demonstrating such knowledge marks you as bright, diligent, and motivated.

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How long does IT take to become a technical support specialist?

It takes about two years to become an IT technical support specialist. At a minimum, an associate degree or certification coupled with on-the-job training and certification can be sufficient to get hired.

To goal of a technical support specialist is to showcase their ability to show proficiency in installing and troubleshooting computer systems, hardware, and applications. Individuals may choose to test for their A+ credential from The Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA).

At a minimum, earning an associate degree is recommended and typically requires two years of full-time study. However, if you are ambitious and already computer savvy, you can gain certifications in key areas related to IT to help build your resume.

The most demanded certifications for an IT specialist include:

  • Certified Cloud Security Professional (CCSP)

  • Certified Data Privacy Solutions Engineer (CDPSE)

  • Certified Data Professional (CDP)

  • Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH)

  • Certified Information Security Manager (CISM)

  • Project Management Professional (PMP)

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How much do technical specialists make?

Technical specialists make $82,524 per year ($39.67 per hour), on average. Technical specialists in the lower 10%, such as entry-level positions, only make about $61,000 a year, while the top 10% average $110,000 per year.

Variation in pay rate for IT technical specialists varies based on one's education, experience, the type of IT position, location, and the number of years experience.

Position Types and Salary for IT With an Associate's Degree or Less:

  • Computer systems analyst ($66,110 per year)

  • Network and computer system administrator ($59,443 per year)

  • Computer programmer ($60,984 per year)

  • Web developer ($66,130 per year)

Position Types and Salary for IT With a Bachelor's Degree:

  • Technical architect ( $114,682 per year)

  • IT project manager ( $88,982 per year)

  • Database administrator ( $73,696 per year)

  • Network security specialist ( $72,156 per year)

  • Software developer or programmer ( $71,986 per year)

  • Business systems analyst ( $69,674 per year)

  • Network administrator ( $60,292 per year)

Type of IT Specialist and Salary:

  • Information security engineer averages $131,300 per year

  • DevOps engineer averages $137,400 per year

  • Enterprise architect averages $144,400 per year

  • Technical program manager averages $145,000 per year

  • Software architect averages $145,400 per year

  • Applications architect averages $149,000 per year

  • Infrastructure architect averages $153,000 per year

  • Software development manager averages $153,300 per year

  • Data warehouse architect averages $154,800 per year

  • Software engineering manager averages $163,500 per year

Location of IT Position and Salary:

  • California averages $134,531 per year

  • Massachusetts averages $131,773 per year

  • New Jersey averages $131,640 per year

  • Virginia averages $129,143 per year

  • District of Columbia averages $127,302 per year

  • Washington averages $125,883 per year

  • Connecticut averages $125,337 per year

  • Maryland averages $124,952 per year

  • New York averages $121,569 per year

  • Rhode Island averages $118,300 per year

  • Arizona averages $117,814 per year

  • Colorado averages $116,995 per year

  • Oregon averages $114,689 per year

  • Texas averages $112,191 per year

  • Illinois averages $111,847 per year

  • Georgia averages $109,403 per year

  • West Virginia averages $109,279 per year

  • New Hampshire averages $108,928 per year

  • Minnesota averages $108,397 per year

  • Delaware averages $108,316 per year

  • Idaho averages $107,548 per year

  • Pennsylvania averages $104,599 per year

  • Ohio averages $103,814 per year

  • Florida averages $102,347 per year

  • North Carolina averages $102,042 per year

  • Wisconsin averages $101,768 per year

  • South Carolina averages $101,224 per year

  • Missouri averages $100,695 per year

  • Michigan averages $100,391 per year

  • Utah averages $100,050 per year

  • Alaska averages $99,993 per year

  • Indiana averages $99,283 per year

  • Nebraska averages $98,711 per year

  • Nevada averages $98,239 per year

  • Louisiana averages $96,583 per year

  • Kentucky averages $95,914 per year

  • Kansas averages $95,127 per year

  • Iowa averages $95,120 per year

  • Hawaii averages $94,917 per year

  • Alabama averages $94,810 per year

  • Oklahoma averages $94,734 per year

  • Arkansas averages $93,033 per year

  • South Dakota averages $92,627 per year

  • Tennessee averages $92,512 per year

  • Mississippi averages $91,955 per year

  • New Mexico averages $88,527 per year

  • Vermont averages $86,775 per year

  • Maine averages $84,916 per year

  • Montana averages $84,570 per year

  • North Dakota averages $80,808 per year

  • Wyoming averages $66,500 per year

The Number of Years of Experience and IT Salary:

  • An entry-level Information Technology Specialist (i.e., less than 1 year of experience) starts at $47,069 per year.

  • An early career Information Technology Specialist (i.e., 1 to 4 years of experience) earns an average of 50,393 per year.

  • A mid-career Information Technology Specialist (i.e., 5 to 9 years of experience) earns an average of $58,232 per year.

  • An experienced Information Technology Specialist (i.e., 10 to 19 years of experience earns an average of $71,025 per year.

  • A late-career (i.e., 20 years and higher) earns an average of $83,721 per year.

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Updated August 18, 2021