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Working as a Teller

If you like handling money, you might look into becoming a bank teller. Just be careful not to steal any of that money. We hear they frown upon that.

The job of a teller can be stressful, especially since you're expected to process routine transactions perfectly. You may even have to deal with people using counterfeit bills or some people who are just plain crabby. But we've found people are generally happy to receive money, so you may be in the clear on this one.

Tellers don't require a lot of formal education. In fact, as long as you have a high school dipolma and receive a month of on-the-job training, then you'll be good to go.

What Does a Teller Do

Tellers are responsible for accurately processing routine transactions at a bank. These transactions include cashing checks, depositing money, and collecting loan payments.

Duties

Tellers typically do the following:

  • Count the cash in their drawer at the start of their shift
  • Accept checks, cash, and other forms of payment from customers
  • Answer questions from customers about their accounts
  • Prepare specialized types of funds, such as traveler’s checks, savings bonds, and money orders
  • Exchange dollars for foreign currency
  • Order bank cards and checks for customers
  • Record all transactions electronically throughout their shift
  • Count the cash in their drawer at the end of their shift and make sure the amounts balance

Tellers are responsible for the safe and accurate handling of the money they process. When cashing a check, they must verify the customer’s identity and make sure that the account has enough money to cover the transaction. When counting cash, tellers must be careful not to make errors. If a customer is interested in financial products or services, such as certificates of deposits (CDs) and loans, tellers explain the products and services offered by the bank and refer the customer to the appropriate personnel.

In most banks, tellers record account changes using computers that give them easy access to the customer’s financial information. Tellers also can use this information when recommending a new product or service.

Head tellers manage teller operations. Besides doing the same tasks as those done by other tellers, they perform some managerial duties, such as setting work schedules or helping less experienced tellers. Because of their experience, head tellers may deal with difficult customer problems, such as errors in customer accounts. Head tellers also go to the vault (where larger amounts of money are kept) and ensure that other tellers have enough cash to cover their shift.

How To Become a Teller

Most tellers have a high school diploma and receive about 1 month of on-the-job training. Some banks do background checks before hiring a new teller.

Education

Tellers usually need a high school diploma or equivalent. Some tellers may take some college courses, but a degree is rarely required for a job applicant to be hired. 

Training

New tellers usually receive brief on-the-job training, typically lasting about 1 month. Normally, a head teller or another experienced teller trains them. During this training, tellers learn how to balance cash drawers and verify signatures. They also learn the computer software that their bank uses and the financial products and services the bank offers.

Advancement

Experienced tellers can advance within their bank. They can become head tellers or move to other supervisory positions. Some tellers can advance to other occupations, such as loan officer. They can also move to sales positions.

Important Qualities

Customer-service skills. Tellers spend their day interacting with bank customers. They must be friendly, helpful, and patient. They must be able to understand customer needs and explain service options to their customers.

Detail oriented. Tellers must be sure not to make errors when dealing with customers’ money. 

Math skills. Because they count and handle large amounts of money, tellers must be good at arithmetic.

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Average Salary$27,971
Job Growth Rate-12%

Teller Career Paths

Top Careers Before Teller

Cashier
21.6 %

Top Careers After Teller

Cashier
10.8 %

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Tell us your goals and we'll match you with the rights job to get there.

Average Salary for a Teller

Tellers in America make an average salary of $27,971 per year or $13 per hour. The top 10 percent makes over $31,000 per year, while the bottom 10 percent under $24,000 per year.
Average Salary
$27,971

Best Paying Cities

City
Average Salary
Fresno, CA
Salary Range25k - 33k$29k$29,376
Colorado Springs, CO
Salary Range26k - 31k$28k$28,451
Austin, MN
Salary Range25k - 31k$28k$28,325
Greenville, NC
Salary Range23k - 34k$28k$28,140
Fargo, ND
Salary Range25k - 30k$28k$28,018
Urban Honolulu, HI
Salary Range25k - 30k$28k$27,982
$20k
$34k

Recently Added Salaries

Job TitleCompanyCompanyStart DateSalary
Teller
Coastal Federal Credit Union
Coastal Federal Credit Union
01/29/2021
01/29/2021
$32,34901/29/2021
$32,349
Teller
Teller
Nefcu
Nefcu
01/29/2021
01/29/2021
$33,39201/29/2021
$33,392
Loomis
Cash Management Services Teller
Cash Management Services Teller
Loomis
Loomis
01/29/2021
01/29/2021
$30,26201/29/2021
$30,262
Teller
Teller
Glacier Bancorp
Glacier Bancorp
01/29/2021
01/29/2021
$33,39201/29/2021
$33,392
Teller Woodruff RD
Teller Woodruff RD
Wells Fargo
Wells Fargo
01/29/2021
01/29/2021
$31,20001/29/2021
$31,200
See More Recent Salaries

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Teller Resumes

Designing and figuring out what to include on your resume can be tough, not to mention time-consuming. That's why we put together a guide that is designed to help you craft the perfect resume for becoming a Teller. If you're needing extra inspiration, take a look through our selection of templates that are specific to your job.

Learn How To Write a Teller Resume

At Zippia, we went through countless Teller resumes and compiled some information about how best to optimize them. Here are some suggestions based on what we found, divided by the individual sections of the resume itself.

View Detailed Information

Teller Demographics

Gender

female

74.3 %

male

22.3 %

unknown

3.4 %

Ethnicity

White

60.4 %

Hispanic or Latino

20.2 %

Black or African American

10.4 %

Foreign Languages Spoken

Spanish

70.9 %

French

5.1 %

Portuguese

2.8 %
See More Demographics

Teller Education

Majors

Business
29.6 %
Finance
6.2 %

Degrees

Bachelors

36.0 %

High School Diploma

29.3 %

Associate

20.4 %
Job type you want
Full Time
Part Time
Internship
Temporary

Top Skills For a Teller

The skills section on your resume can be almost as important as the experience section, so you want it to be an accurate portrayal of what you can do. Luckily, we've found all of the skills you'll need so even if you don't have these skills yet, you know what you need to work on. Out of all the resumes we looked through, 16.7% of tellers listed customer service on their resume, but soft skills such as customer-service skills and detail oriented are important as well.

  • Customer Service, 16.7%
  • Bank Products, 14.8%
  • Communication, 10.7%
  • Financial Transactions, 9.3%
  • Savings Bonds, 5.1%
  • Other Skills, 43.4%
  • See All Teller Skills

Best States For a Teller

Some places are better than others when it comes to starting a career as a teller. The best states for people in this position are California, New Jersey, Colorado, and Connecticut. Tellers make the most in California with an average salary of $29,319. Whereas in New Jersey and Colorado, they would average $28,446 and $28,408, respectively. While tellers would only make an average of $28,393 in Connecticut, you would still make more there than in the rest of the country. We determined these as the best states based on job availability and pay. By finding the median salary, cost of living, and using the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Location Quotient, we narrowed down our list of states to these four.

1. Arizona

Total Teller Jobs:
2,002
Highest 10% Earn:
$34,000
Location Quotient:
1.34
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

2. Wyoming

Total Teller Jobs:
200
Highest 10% Earn:
$31,000
Location Quotient:
1.47
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

3. Nevada

Total Teller Jobs:
667
Highest 10% Earn:
$34,000
Location Quotient:
1.19
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here
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Top Teller Employers

1. Wells Fargo
4.7
Avg. Salary: 
$27,516
Tellers Hired: 
19,528+
2. Bank of America
4.8
Avg. Salary: 
$27,512
Tellers Hired: 
10,569+
3. JPMorgan Chase
4.9
Avg. Salary: 
$27,512
Tellers Hired: 
5,890+
4. U.S. Bank
4.7
Avg. Salary: 
$28,278
Tellers Hired: 
4,213+
5. The PNC Financial Services Group
4.9
Avg. Salary: 
$27,515
Tellers Hired: 
3,818+
6. Regions Bank
4.8
Avg. Salary: 
$27,517
Tellers Hired: 
2,357+

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