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Become A Truck Driver Class A

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Working As A Truck Driver Class A

  • Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment
  • Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material
  • Getting Information
  • Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events
  • Controlling Machines and Processes
  • Mostly Sitting

  • Stressful

  • $28,542

    Average Salary

What Does A Truck Driver Class A Do

Heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers transport goods from one location to another. Most tractor-trailer drivers are long-haul drivers and operate trucks with a gross vehicle weight (GVW) capacity of more than 26,000 pounds. These drivers deliver goods over intercity routes, sometimes spanning several states.

Duties

Heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers typically do the following:

  • Drive long distances
  • Report to a dispatcher any incidents encountered on the road
  • Follow all applicable traffic laws
  • Inspect their trailers before and after the trip, and record any defects they find
  • Maintain a log of their working hours, following all federal and state regulations
  • Report serious mechanical problems to the appropriate personnel
  • Keep their trucks and associated equipment clean and in good working order

Most heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers’ routes are assigned by a dispatcher, but some independent drivers still plan their own routes. They may use satellite tracking to help them plan.

A driver must know which roads allow trucks and which do not. Drivers also must plan legally required rest periods into their trip. Some drivers have one or two routes that they drive regularly, and others drivers take many different routes throughout the country. Also, some drivers have routes that include Mexico or Canada.

Companies sometimes use two drivers, known as teams, on long runs in order to minimize downtime. On these team runs, one driver sleeps in a berth behind the cab while the other drives.

Certain cargo requires drivers to adhere to additional safety regulations. Some heavy truck drivers who transport hazardous materials, such as chemical waste, must take special precautions when driving, and may carry specialized safety equipment in case of an accident. Other drivers, such as those carrying liquids, oversized loads, or cars, must follow rules that apply specifically to them.

Some long-haul truck drivers, called owner–operators, buy or lease trucks and go into business for themselves. In addition to their driving tasks, owner-operators also have business tasks, including finding and keeping clients and doing administrative work, such as accounting.

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How To Become A Truck Driver Class A

Heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers usually have a high school diploma and attend a professional truckdriving school. They must have a commercial driver’s license (CDL).

Education

Most companies require their truck drivers to have a high school diploma or equivalent.

Many companies require drivers to attend professional truckdriving schools, where they take training courses to learn how to maneuver large vehicles on highways or through crowded streets. During these classes, drivers also learn the federal laws and regulations governing interstate truck driving. Students attend either a private truckdriving school or a program at a community college that lasts between 3 and 6 months.

Upon finishing their classes, drivers receive a certificate of completion.

The U.S. Department of Transportation is considering a requirement that mandates all newly hired interstate truck drivers to take a truckdriving course.

The Professional Truck Driver Institute (PTDI) certifies a small percentage of driver-training courses at truckdriver training schools that meet both the industry standards and the U.S. Department of Transportation guidelines for training tractor-trailer drivers.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

All long-haul truck drivers must have a commercial driver’s license (CDL). Qualifications for obtaining a CDL vary by state but generally include passing both a knowledge test and a driving test. States have the right to refuse to issue a CDL to anyone who has had a CDL suspended by another state.

Drivers can get endorsements to their CDL that show their ability to drive a specialized type of vehicle. Truck drivers transporting hazardous materials (HAZMAT) must have a hazardous materials endorsement (H). Getting this endorsement requires passing an additional knowledge test and a background check.

Federal regulations require random testing of on-duty truck drivers for drug or alcohol abuse. In addition, truck drivers can have their CDL suspended if they are convicted of driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs or are convicted of a felony involving the use of a motor vehicle.

Other actions can result in a suspension after multiple violations. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration website has a list of these violations. Additionally, some companies have stricter standards than what federal regulations require.

Training

After completing truckdriving school and being hired by a company, drivers normally receive between 1 and 3 months of on-the-job training. During this time, they drive a truck with a more experienced mentor–driver in the passenger seat. This period of on-the-job training is given so that the new drivers will learn more about the specific type of truck they will drive and material they will transport.

Important Qualities

Hand-eye coordination. Drivers of heavy trucks and tractor-trailers must be able to coordinate their legs, hands, and eyes simultaneously so that they will react appropriately to the situation around them and drive the vehicle safely.

Hearing ability. Truck drivers need good hearing. Federal regulations require that a driver be able to hear a forced whisper in one ear at 5 feet (with or without the use of a hearing aid).

Physical health. Federal regulations do not allow people to become truck drivers if they have a medical condition, such as high blood pressure or epilepsy, which may interfere with their ability to operate a truck. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration website has a full list of medical conditions that disqualify someone from driving a long-haul truck.

Visual ability. Truck drivers must be able to pass vision tests. Federal regulations require a driver to have at least 20/40 vision with a 70-degree field of vision in each eye and the ability to distinguish the colors on a traffic light.

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Do you work as a Truck Driver Class A?

Truck Driver Class A Jobs

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Truck Driver Class A Career Paths

Truck Driver Class A
Shuttle Driver Technician Foreman
Construction Superintendent
9 Yearsyrs
Log Truck Driver Equipment Operator Project Manager
Delivery Manager
8 Yearsyrs
Flatbed Driver Route Driver Operation Supervisor
Distribution Manager
7 Yearsyrs
Haul Truck Driver Heavy Equipment Operator Driver
Driver Manager
5 Yearsyrs
CDL Class A Driver Dump Truck Driver Delivery Driver
Driver Supervisor
5 Yearsyrs
Dump Truck Driver Tractor-Trailer Driver Driver
Driver/Owner Operator
6 Yearsyrs
Log Truck Driver Driver Field Supervisor
Estimator Project Manager
9 Yearsyrs
Yard Jockey Route Driver Driver
Fleet Manager
7 Yearsyrs
Shuttle Driver Forklift Operator Carpenter
General Contractor
6 Yearsyrs
Hauler Operator Foreman
General Superintendent
11 Yearsyrs
Driver/Owner Operator Operator Driver
Lead Driver
5 Yearsyrs
Commercial Truck Driver Maintenance Technician Production Supervisor
Logistics Supervisor
5 Yearsyrs
Dump Truck Driver Delivery Driver Equipment Operator
Operator And Truck Driver
5 Yearsyrs
Transportation Driver Driver/Owner Operator Route Driver
Route Manager
6 Yearsyrs
Driver/Owner Operator Delivery Driver Operations Manager
Terminal Manager
9 Yearsyrs
Flatbed Truck Driver Truck Driver-Over-The-Road Driver
Transportation Manager
8 Yearsyrs
Tank Driver Equipment Operator Operation Supervisor
Transportation Supervisor
7 Yearsyrs
Haul Truck Driver Dump Truck Driver Forklift Operator
Warehouse Manager
5 Yearsyrs
Transportation Driver Maintenance Technician Production Supervisor
Warehouse Supervisor
5 Yearsyrs
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Do you work as a Truck Driver Class A?

Help others decide if this is a good career for them

Average Length of Employment
Truck Driver 3.7 years
Class B Driver 3.6 years
Line Haul Driver 3.0 years
Class A Driver 2.9 years
CDL Driver 2.8 years
CDL Class A Driver 2.7 years
Driver 2.6 years
Haul Truck Driver 2.5 years
Local Truck Driver 2.3 years
Company Driver 2.2 years
Dump Truck Driver 2.1 years
Flatbed Driver 1.5 years
Top Employers Before
Truck Driver 35.4%
Driver 10.8%
Cashier 2.7%
Mechanic 2.3%
Bus Driver 2.1%
Top Employers After
Truck Driver 34.4%
Driver 14.1%
Bus Driver 2.0%
Owner 1.6%

Do you work as a Truck Driver Class A?

Truck Driver Class A Demographics

Gender

Male

89.4%

Female

9.4%

Unknown

1.1%
Ethnicity

White

63.2%

Hispanic or Latino

15.8%

Black or African American

11.4%

Asian

6.2%

Unknown

3.5%
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Languages Spoken

Spanish

63.9%

French

7.4%

Arabic

4.6%

Portuguese

2.8%

German

2.8%

Carrier

2.8%

Swahili

1.9%

Somali

1.9%

Dakota

1.9%

Russian

1.9%

Ukrainian

0.9%

Maltese

0.9%

Japanese

0.9%

Cherokee

0.9%

Urdu

0.9%

Dari

0.9%

Hindi

0.9%

Kinyarwanda

0.9%

Korean

0.9%
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Truck Driver Class A Education

Schools

University of Phoenix

16.8%

Houston Community College

6.9%

Universal Technical Institute

5.7%

Diesel Driving Academy

5.7%

Ashford University

5.0%

Kirkwood Community College

5.0%

South Plains College

4.6%

Amarillo College

4.6%

Kaplan University

4.6%

The Academy

4.2%

Central Texas College

4.2%

Hinds Community College

3.8%

Iowa Central Community College

3.8%

Hawkeye Community College

3.8%

Baker College

3.8%

All-State Career School

3.8%

New England Tractor Trailer Training School

3.4%

Del Mar College

3.4%

Fresno City College

3.4%

Butte College

3.4%
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Majors

Business

19.2%

General Education, Specific Areas

12.9%

Automotive Technology

10.3%

Criminal Justice

10.0%

General Studies

8.5%

Precision Metal Working

5.5%

Graphic Design

4.1%

Computer Science

3.7%

Electrical Engineering

3.2%

Electrical Engineering Technology

3.0%

Accounting

2.6%

Heavy/Industrial Equipment Maintenance Technologies

2.5%

Education

2.1%

Heating And Air Conditioning

2.1%

Management

2.0%

Nursing Assistants

1.8%

Medical Technician

1.8%

Industrial Technology

1.6%

Communication

1.6%

Environmental Control Technologies/Technicians

1.6%
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Degrees

Other

54.6%

Associate

14.9%

Certificate

12.9%

Bachelors

10.7%

Diploma

3.0%

License

2.2%

Masters

1.6%

Doctorate

0.0%
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Part Time
Internship
Temporary

Real Truck Driver Class A Salaries

Job Title Company Location Start Date Salary
Company Class A Trucker Driver BN Trux Inc. Ferndale, WA Feb 17, 2015 $49,984
Class A CDL Truck Driver Getgo Transportation L.L.C. Millbury, OH Jan 01, 2013 $46,696
Class A CDL Truck Driver Getgo Transportation L.L.C. Millbury, OH Jan 01, 2013 $28,988 -
$35,479
Class A CDL Truck Driver Getgo Transportation L.L.C. Millbury, OH Nov 01, 2012 $28,988 -
$35,479

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Top Skills for A Truck Driver Class A

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  1. Delivery Instructions
  2. Safety
  3. Tractor Trailers
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Maintained telephone and radio contact with supervisor to receive delivery instructions.
  • Operated delivery vans in accordance with company safety policies and procedures.
  • Lease driver that operated clients' tractor trailers, making local deliveries to their customers.
  • Pick up and deliver freight on a daily basis for a regional OTR company.
  • Truck Driver CDL Class B with Tanker Endorsement Responsibilities SCHEDULED CEMENT DELIVERIES to residential and commercial construction sites.

How Would You Rate Working As a Truck Driver Class A?

Are you working as a Truck Driver Class A? Help us rate Truck Driver Class A as a Career.

Top Truck Driver Class A Employers

Jobs From Top Truck Driver Class A Employers

Truck Driver Class A Videos

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