What is a Truck Mechanic

A truck mechanic is an individual who inspects and repairs trucks and ensures that all vehicles are operating efficiently and safely. These professionals diagnose problems and implement fixes and are also responsible for the inspection and repair of truck brake systems, engines, transmissions, electrical components, and steering systems. These individuals typically work for truck manufacturers and dealers, freight companies, government agencies, and repair shops.

Although a college degree is not a requirement to land a job as a truck mechanic, these individuals often have a certificate or an associate's degree in diesel mechanics or a related training program. Truck mechanics often need the necessary physical strength to perform such duties, such as using heavy tools and lifting equipment, and they should possess strong communication, analytical, and engineering skills.

Truck mechanics can make up to $49,000 per year, and the career field is expected to grow by 5% in the next ten years.

What Does a Truck Mechanic Do

Diesel service technicians and mechanics inspect, repair, or overhaul buses and trucks, or maintain and repair any type of diesel engine.

Learn more about what a Truck Mechanic does

How To Become a Truck Mechanic

Most diesel technicians learn informally on the job after a high school education, but employers increasingly prefer applicants who have completed postsecondary training programs in diesel engine repair. Although not required, industry certification can demonstrate a diesel technician’s competence and experience.

Education

Most employers require a high school diploma or equivalent. High school or postsecondary courses in automotive repair, electronics, and mathematics provide a strong educational background for a career as a diesel technician.

An increasing number of employers look for workers with postsecondary training in diesel engine repair. Many community colleges and trade and vocational schools offer certificate or degree programs in diesel engine repair.

Programs mix classroom instruction with hands-on training, including the basics of diesel technology, repair techniques and equipment, and practical exercises. Students also learn how to interpret technical manuals and electronic diagnostic reports.

Training

Diesel technicians who begin working without any postsecondary education are trained extensively on the job. Trainees are assigned basic tasks, such as cleaning parts, checking fuel and oil levels, and driving vehicles in and out of the shop.

After they learn routine maintenance and repair tasks and demonstrate competence, trainees move on to more complicated subjects such as vehicle diagnostics. This process can take from 3 to 4 years, at which point a trainee is usually considered a journey-level diesel technician.

Over the course of their careers, diesel technicians must learn to use new techniques and equipment. Employers often send experienced technicians to special training classes conducted by manufacturers and vendors to learn about the latest diesel technology.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Certification from the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) is the standard credential for diesel and other automotive service technicians and mechanics. Although not required, this certification demonstrates a diesel technician’s competence and experience to potential employers and clients, and often brings higher pay.

Diesel technicians may be certified in specific repair areas, such as drive trains, electronic systems, or preventative maintenance and inspection. To earn certification, technicians must have 2 years of work experience and pass one or more ASE exams. To remain certified, diesel technicians must pass a recertification exam every 5 years.

Many diesel technicians are required to have a commercial driver’s license so they may test-drive buses and large trucks.

Important Qualities

Customer-service skills. Diesel technicians frequently discuss automotive problems and necessary repairs with their customers. They must be courteous, good listeners, and ready to answer customers’ questions.

Detail oriented. Diesel technicians must be aware of small details when inspecting or repairing engines and components, because mechanical and electronic malfunctions are often due to misalignments and other easy-to-miss causes.

Dexterity. Mechanics need a steady hand and good hand-eye coordination for many tasks, such as disassembling engine parts, connecting or attaching components, or using hand tools.

Mechanical skills. Diesel technicians must be familiar with engine components and systems and know how they interact with each other. They often disassemble major parts for repairs, and they must be able to put them back together properly.

Organizational skills. Diesel technicians must keep workspaces clean and organized in order to maintain safety and ensure accountability for parts.

Strength. Diesel technicians often lift heavy parts and tools, such as exhaust system components and pneumatic wrenches.

Troubleshooting skills. Diesel technicians must be able to use diagnostic equipment on engine systems and components in order to identify and fix problems in increasingly complicated mechanical and electronic systems. They must be familiar with electronic control systems and the appropriate tools needed to fix and maintain them.

What is the right job for my career path?

Tell us your goals and we'll match you with the right jobs to get there.

And if you’re looking for a job, here are the five top employers hiring now:

  1. Republic Services Jobs (15)
  2. Cummins Jobs (8)
  3. Waste Connections Jobs (8)
  4. TravelCenters of America Jobs (6)
  5. FedEx Jobs (8)
Average Salary
$47,823
Average Salary
Job Growth Rate
5%
Job Growth Rate
Job Openings
80,152
Job Openings
resume document icon

Don't Have A Professional Resume?

0 selections

Truck Mechanic Career Paths

Top Careers Before Truck Mechanic

Top Careers After Truck Mechanic

Truck Mechanic Jobs You Might Like

What is the right job for my career path?

Tell us your goals and we'll match you with the rights job to get there.

Average Salary for a Truck Mechanic

Truck Mechanics in America make an average salary of $47,823 per year or $23 per hour. The top 10 percent makes over $64,000 per year, while the bottom 10 percent under $35,000 per year.
Average Salary
$47,823
Find Your Salary Estimate
How much should you be earning as an Truck Mechanic? Use Zippia's Salary Calculator to get an estimation of how much you should be earning.
See More Salary Information

Calculate your salary

Use Zippia's Salary Calculator to see how your pay matches up.

5 Truck Mechanic Resume Examples

Learn How To Write a Truck Mechanic Resume

At Zippia, we went through countless Truck Mechanic resumes and compiled some information about how to optimize them. Here are some suggestions based on what we found, divided by the individual sections of the resume itself.

View Truck Mechanic Resume Examples And Templates

And if you’re looking for a job, here are the five top employers hiring now:

  1. Republic Services Jobs (15)
  2. Cummins Jobs (8)
  3. Waste Connections Jobs (8)
  4. TravelCenters of America Jobs (6)
  5. FedEx Jobs (8)

Choose From 10+ Customizable Truck Mechanic Resume templates

Zippia allows you to choose from different easy-to-use Truck Mechanic templates, and provides you with expert advice. Using the templates, you can rest assured that the structure and format of your Truck Mechanic resume is top notch. Choose a template with the colors, fonts & text sizes that are appropriate for your industry.

Truck Mechanic Resume
Truck Mechanic Resume
Truck Mechanic Resume
Truck Mechanic Resume
Truck Mechanic Resume
Truck Mechanic Resume
Truck Mechanic Resume
Truck Mechanic Resume
Truck Mechanic Resume
Truck Mechanic Resume
Truck Mechanic Resume
Truck Mechanic Resume
Truck Mechanic Resume
Truck Mechanic Resume
Truck Mechanic Resume
Truck Mechanic Resume

Truck Mechanic Demographics

Truck Mechanic Gender Statistics

male

97.3 %

female

2.7 %

Truck Mechanic Ethnicity Statistics

White

71.8 %

Hispanic or Latino

14.9 %

Black or African American

8.5 %

Truck Mechanic Foreign Languages Spoken Statistics

Spanish

46.7 %

French

13.3 %

German

6.7 %
Job Openings

Find the best Truck Mechanic job for you

0 selections
0 selections

Truck Mechanic Jobs You Might Like

Truck Mechanic Education

Truck Mechanic Majors

Truck Mechanic Degrees

High School Diploma

37.3 %

Associate

29.5 %

Diploma

18.5 %
Job Openings

Find the best Truck Mechanic job for you

0 selections
0 selections

Truck Mechanic Jobs You Might Like

Online Courses For Truck Mechanic That You May Like

Diesel Engine Fundamentals (Mechanical Engineering)
udemy
4.6
(264)

Learn about the diesel engine! Ideal for Automotive Engineering and Automobile Engineering!...

Automobile Engineering: Vehicle dynamics for Beginners
udemy
4.1
(597)

Introductory course on the mechanics which govern vehicle behavior and the Suspension design concepts...

Control Systems Made Simple Beginner's Guide
udemy
4.5
(546)

Learn fundamentals of Mechanical & electrical system modeling, simulation and control with this unique practical course!...

Show More Truck Mechanic Courses
Job type you want
Full Time
Part Time
Internship
Temporary

Top Skills For a Truck Mechanic

The skills section on your resume can be almost as important as the experience section, so you want it to be an accurate portrayal of what you can do. Luckily, we've found all of the skills you'll need so even if you don't have these skills yet, you know what you need to work on. Out of all the resumes we looked through, 17.7% of Truck Mechanics listed CDL on their resume, but soft skills such as Customer-service skills and Detail oriented are important as well.

Best States For a Truck Mechanic

Some places are better than others when it comes to starting a career as a Truck Mechanic. The best states for people in this position are New Jersey, New Hampshire, North Dakota, and Massachusetts. Truck Mechanics make the most in New Jersey with an average salary of $61,825. Whereas in New Hampshire and North Dakota, they would average $61,486 and $58,462, respectively. While Truck Mechanics would only make an average of $58,404 in Massachusetts, you would still make more there than in the rest of the country. We determined these as the best states based on job availability and pay. By finding the median salary, cost of living, and using the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Location Quotient, we narrowed down our list of states to these four.

1. North Dakota

Total Truck Mechanic Jobs:
138
Highest 10% Earn:
$73,000
Location Quotient:
0.94
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

2. Massachusetts

Total Truck Mechanic Jobs:
2,010
Highest 10% Earn:
$73,000
Location Quotient:
1.38
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

3. New York

Total Truck Mechanic Jobs:
3,740
Highest 10% Earn:
$75,000
Location Quotient:
1.84
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here
Full List Of Best States For Truck Mechanics

How Do Truck Mechanic Rate Their Jobs?

Working as a Truck Mechanic? Share your experience anonymously.
Do you work as a Truck Mechanic?
Rate how you like work as Truck Mechanic. It's anonymous and will only take a minute.

Top Truck Mechanic Employers

Most Common Employers For Truck Mechanic

RankCompanyZippia ScoreAverage Truck Mechanic SalaryAverage Salary
1$56,465
2$54,993
3$53,970
4$46,811
5$44,970
6$44,408

Truck Mechanic Videos