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Become An Urban Gardening Specialist

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Working As An Urban Gardening Specialist

  • Documenting/Recording Information
  • Getting Information
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates
  • Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings
  • Processing Information
  • Repetitive

  • $77,000

    Average Salary

What Does An Urban Gardening Specialist Do

Agricultural and food science technicians assist agricultural and food scientists by performing duties such as measuring and analyzing the quality of food and agricultural products. Duties range from typical agricultural labor with added recordkeeping duties to laboratory testing with significant amounts of office work, depending on the particular field the technician works in.

Duties

Specific duties of these technicians vary with their specialty.

Agricultural science technicians typically do the following:

  • Follow protocols to collect, prepare, analyze, and properly store crop or animal samples
  • Operate farm equipment and maintain agricultural production areas to conform to scientific testing parameters
  • Examine animal and crop specimens to determine the presence of diseases or other problems
  • Measure ingredients used in animal feed and other inputs
  • Prepare and operate laboratory testing equipment
  • Compile and analyze test results
  • Prepare charts, presentations, and reports describing test results

Food science technicians typically do the following:

  • Collect and prepare samples in accordance with established procedures
  • Test food, food additives, and food containers to ensure that they comply with established safety standards
  • Help food scientists with food research, development, and quality control
  • Analyze chemical properties of food to determine ingredients and formulas
  • Compile and analyze test results
  • Prepare charts, presentations, and reports describing test results
  • Prepare and maintain quantities of chemicals needed to perform laboratory tests
  • Maintain a safe, sterile laboratory environment

Agricultural and food science technicians often specialize by subject area. Some popular subjects are animal health, farm machinery, fertilizers, agricultural chemicals, and processing technology. Duties can vary considerably with the specialization, because work settings may vary.

Agricultural science technicians who work in private industry typically focus on increasing the productivity of crops and animals. These workers may keep detailed records, collect samples for analyses, ensure that samples meet proper safety and quality standards, and test crops and animals for disease or to otherwise confirm the results of scientific experiments.

Food science technicians who work in private industry typically evaluate food and crops while investigating new production or processing techniques. They also ensure that products will be fit for distribution or are produced as efficiently as expected. Many food science technicians spend time inspecting foodstuffs, chemicals, and additives to determine whether they are safe and have the proper combination of ingredients.

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How To Become An Urban Gardening Specialist

Agricultural and food science technicians typically need an associate’s degree in biology, chemistry, crop or animal science, or a related field. Many positions require a bachelor’s degree. For those positions requiring only a high school diploma, technicians typically need to have previous work experience. Technicians often receive on-the-job training that may cover topics such as production techniques, personal hygiene, and sanitation procedures.

Education

Students interested in this occupation should take as many high school science and math classes as possible. A solid background in applied chemistry, biology, physics, math, and statistics is important. Knowledge of how to use spreadsheets and databases also may be necessary.

Agricultural and food science technicians typically need an associate’s degree in biology, chemistry, crop or animal science, or a related field from an accredited college or university. Many agricultural and food science technician positions require a bachelor’s degree. While in college, prospective technicians learn through a combination of technical instruction and hands-on experiences, such as internships.

Some agricultural and food science technicians successfully enter the occupation with a high school diploma but typically need related work experience and on-the-job training that may last a year or more. 

A background in the biological or chemical sciences is important for most agricultural and food science technicians. Students may find it helpful to take courses in biology, chemistry, plant or animal science, and agricultural engineering as part of their programs. Many schools offer internships, cooperative-education, and other programs designed to provide hands-on experience and enhance employment prospects.

Training

Agricultural and food science technicians typically undergo on-the-job training. Various federal government regulations outline the types of training needed for technicians, which varies according to the work environment and specific job requirements. Training may cover topics such as production techniques, personal hygiene, and sanitation procedures.

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Agricultural and food science technicians must conduct a variety of observations and on-site measurements, all of which require precision and accuracy.

Communication skills. Agricultural and food science technicians must be able to understand and give clear instructions, keep detailed records, and, occasionally, write reports.

Critical-thinking skills. Agricultural and food science technicians reach conclusions through sound reasoning and judgment. They determine how to improve food quality and must test products for a variety of safety standards.

Interpersonal skills. Agricultural and food science technicians need to work well with others. They may supervise agricultural and food science workers and receive instruction from scientists or specialists, so effective communication is critical.

Physical stamina. Agricultural and food science technicians who work in manufacturing or agricultural settings may need to stand for long periods, lift objects, and generally perform physical labor.

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

Workers who enter the occupation with only a high school diploma often must have years of experience in a related occupation during which they develop their knowledge of agriculture or manufacturing processes. For more information, see the profiles on food and tobacco processing workers and agricultural workers.

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Top Skills for An Urban Gardening Specialist

  1. Adobe Customer Service
  2. Customer Service
  3. New Merchandise
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Manage Garden Department to provide quality horticulture with excellent customer service.
  • Maintained a multi-line phone system.GARDEN SPECIALIST, HOME DEPOT
  • Provide knowledge about gardening and plant care to customers and retail associates.
  • Provided technical assistance to USAID and served as project management for a number of international development programs.
  • Assisted communities in acquiring project funding assistance from other government agencies and private organizations.

Urban Gardening Specialist Demographics

Gender

Male

44.2%

Female

43.8%

Unknown

12.0%
Ethnicity

White

64.0%

Hispanic or Latino

16.0%

Black or African American

11.3%

Asian

4.6%

Unknown

4.1%
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Foreign Languages Spoken

Spanish

42.1%

Japanese

10.5%

French

10.5%

German

5.3%

Persian

5.3%

Tagalog

5.3%

Cantonese

5.3%

Korean

5.3%

Tamil

5.3%

Italian

5.3%
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Urban Gardening Specialist Education

Schools

University of Oklahoma

7.3%

University of San Francisco

4.9%

Emory University

4.9%

West Chester University of Pennsylvania

4.9%

Tulane University

4.9%

Gainesville State College

4.9%

Santa Fe Community College

4.9%

Maricopa Community Colleges - Scottsdale Community College

4.9%

Brigham Young University

4.9%

Central Michigan University

4.9%

New Mexico State University

4.9%

Kent State University

4.9%

Western Oregon University

4.9%

University of North Texas

4.9%

Santa Ana College

4.9%

University of Southern Mississippi

4.9%

Fashion Institute of Technology

4.9%

Old Dominion University

4.9%

The Academy

4.9%

Northeastern University

4.9%
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Majors

Business

20.0%

Plant Sciences

7.6%

Criminal Justice

7.6%

Environmental Science

5.7%

Biology

4.8%

Psychology

4.8%

Graphic Design

4.8%

Nursing

3.8%

Liberal Arts

3.8%

Architecture

3.8%

Education

3.8%

Communication

3.8%

Medical Assisting Services

3.8%

Applied Horticulture

3.8%

Law

3.8%

Culinary Arts

2.9%

Natural Resources Management

2.9%

Kinesiology

2.9%

General Studies

2.9%

Finance

2.9%
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Degrees

Bachelors

36.3%

Other

26.9%

Associate

13.9%

Masters

11.9%

Certificate

7.5%

Diploma

1.5%

Doctorate

1.5%

License

0.5%
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