Find The Best Video Editor Jobs For You

Where do you want to work?

0 selections

Video Editor Careers

The work of a video editor involves arranging, rearranging, manipulating, and enhancing video shots to create a new and complete work. The job of a video editor is to create and edit videos using digital software that edits, cuts, trims films, and organizes raw film materials into a final product. Video editors work with materials like camera footage, dialogues, graphics, and sound effects to produce a final video product based on specific requirements.

To be a certified video editor, you need to acquire a bachelor's degree in videography, film production, cinematography, and any other related field is a requirement to work in this field. But more importantly, you should also have hands-on experience with digital video editing software. Alongside these qualifications, you need to be creative and intellectually sound. Good adaptive skills are also necessary. Typically, the income per hour for a video editor starts from about $13.16. The average hourly income for a video editor is about $25.64 but can go as high up as $49.93 per hour.

What Does a Video Editor Do

Film and video editors and camera operators manipulate images that entertain or inform an audience. Camera operators capture a wide range of material for TV shows, motion pictures, music videos, documentaries, or news and sporting events. Editors take footage shot by camera operators and organize it into a final product. They collaborate with producers and directors to create the final production.

Duties

Film and video editors and camera operators typically do the following:

  • Shoot and record television programs, motion pictures, music videos, documentaries, or news and sporting events
  • Organize digital footage with video editing software
  • Collaborate with a director to determine the overall vision of the production
  • Discuss filming and editing techniques with a director to improve a scene
  • Select the appropriate equipment, such as the type of lens or lighting
  • Shoot or edit a scene based on the director’s vision

Many camera operators have one or more assistants working under their supervision. The assistants set up the camera equipment and may be responsible for its storage and care. They also help the operator determine the best shooting angle and make sure that the camera stays in focus.

Likewise, editors often have one or more assistants. The assistants support the editor by keeping track of each shot in a database or loading digital video into an editing bay. Assistants also may do some of the editing tasks.

The increased use of digital filming has changed the work of a large number of editors and camera operators. Many operators prefer using digital cameras because these smaller, more inexpensive instruments give them more flexibility in shooting angles. Digital cameras also have changed the job of some camera assistants: instead of loading film or choosing lenses, they download digital images or choose a type of software program to use with the camera.

Nearly all editing work is done on a computer, and editors often are trained in a specific type of editing software.

The following are examples of types of camera operators:

Studio camera operators work in a broadcast studio and videotape their subjects from a fixed position. There may be one or several cameras in use at a time. Operators normally follow directions that give the order of the shots. They often have time to practice camera movements before shooting begins. If they are shooting a live event, they must be able to make adjustments at a moment’s notice and follow the instructions of the show’s director.

Cinematographers film motion pictures. They usually have a team of camera operators and assistants working under them. They determine the angles and types of equipment that will best capture a shot. They also adjust the lighting in a shot, because that is an important part of how the image looks.

Cinematographers may use stationary cameras that shoot whatever passes in front of them, or they may use a camera mounted on a track and move around the action. Some cinematographers sit on cranes to film and action scene; others carry the camera on their shoulder while they move around the action.

Some cinematographers specialize in filming cartoons or special effects.

Videographers film or videotape private ceremonies or special events, such as weddings. They also may work with companies and make corporate documentaries on a variety of topics. Some videographers post their work on video-sharing websites for prospective clients. Most videographers edit their own material.

Many videographers run their own business or do freelance work. They may submit bids, write contracts, and get permission to shoot on locations that may not be open to the public. They also get copyright protection for their work and keep financial records.

Many editors and camera operators, particularly videographers, put their creative work online. If it becomes popular, they gain more recognition, which can lead to future employment or freelance opportunities.

How To Become a Video Editor

Film and video editors and camera operators typically need a bachelor’s degree in a field related to film or broadcasting.

Education

Most editor and camera operator positions require a bachelor’s degree in a field related to film or broadcasting, such as communications. Many colleges offer courses in cinematography or video-editing software. Coursework involves a mix of film theory with practical training.

Film and video editors and camera operators must have an understanding of digital cameras and editing software because both are now used on film sets.

Training

Editors may complete a brief period of on-the-job training. Some employers may offer new employees training in the type of specialized editing software they use. Most editors eventually specialize in one type of software, but beginners should be familiar with as many types as possible.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Certification is a way for editors to demonstrate competence in various types of editing software. To earn certification, video editors must pass a comprehensive exam. Candidates can prepare for the exam on their own, through online tutorials, or through classroom instruction.

Important Qualities

Communication skills. Film and video editors and camera operators must communicate with other members of a production team, including producers and directors, to ensure that the project goes smoothly.

Computer skills. Film and video editors must use sophisticated editing software.

Creativity. Film and video editors and camera operators should be able to imagine what the result of their filming or editing will look like to an audience.

Detail oriented. Editors look at every frame of film and decide what should be kept and what should be cut in order to maintain the best content.

Hand–eye coordination. Camera operators need to be able to move about the action while holding a camera steady.

Physical stamina. Camera operators may need to carry heavy equipment for long periods of time, particularly when they are filming on location.

Visual skills. Film and video editors and camera operators must be able to see clearly what they are filming or editing in the postproduction process.

What is the right job for my career path?

Tell us your goals and we'll match you with the right jobs to get there.

Average Salary
$46,954
Average Salary
Job Growth Rate
11%
Job Growth Rate
Job Openings
8,625
Job Openings

Video Editor Career Paths

Top Careers Before Video Editor

Editor
8.1 %

Top Careers After Video Editor

Editor
8.4 %

Video Editor Jobs You Might Like

What is the right job for my career path?

Tell us your goals and we'll match you with the rights job to get there.

Average Salary for a Video Editor

Video Editors in America make an average salary of $46,954 per year or $23 per hour. The top 10 percent makes over $72,000 per year, while the bottom 10 percent under $30,000 per year.
Average Salary
$46,954
Find Your Salary Estimate
How much should you be earning as an Architect? Use Zippia's Salary Calculator to get an estimation of how much you should be earning.

Best Paying Cities

City
ascdesc
Average Salarydesc
Newark, NJ
Salary Range49k - 85k$65k$65,205
Anchorage, AK
Salary Range44k - 75k$58k$58,014
New York, NY
Salary Range43k - 75k$57k$57,109
South San Francisco, CA
Salary Range38k - 73k$53k$52,776
Boston, MA
Salary Range38k - 68k$51k$51,217
Arlington, VA
Salary Range38k - 64k$50k$50,080
$24k
$85k

Recently Added Salaries

Job TitleCompanyascdescCompanyascdescStart DateascdescSalaryascdesc
Video Editor
Video Editor
Tegna
Tegna
06/30/2021
06/30/2021
$50,08806/30/2021
$50,088
Video Editor
Video Editor
Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee
Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee
06/17/2021
06/17/2021
$60,00006/17/2021
$60,000
Video Editor IV
Video Editor IV
Randstad
Randstad
06/12/2021
06/12/2021
$104,35006/12/2021
$104,350
Video Editor
Video Editor
Everlight Solar, LLC.
Everlight Solar, LLC.
05/23/2021
05/23/2021
$22,00005/23/2021
$22,000
Video Editor
Video Editor
Everlight Solar, LLC.
Everlight Solar, LLC.
05/23/2021
05/23/2021
$22,00005/23/2021
$22,000
See More Recent Salaries

Calculate your salary

Use Zippia's Salary Calculator to see how your pay matches up.

Video Editor Resumes

Designing and figuring out what to include on your resume can be tough, not to mention time-consuming. That's why we put together a guide that is designed to help you craft the perfect resume for becoming a Video Editor. If you're needing extra inspiration, take a look through our selection of templates that are specific to your job.

Learn How To Write a Video Editor Resume

At Zippia, we went through countless Video Editor resumes and compiled some information about how best to optimize them. Here are some suggestions based on what we found, divided by the individual sections of the resume itself.

View Detailed Information

Video Editor Demographics

Gender

male

70.6 %

female

24.1 %

unknown

5.3 %

Ethnicity

White

68.5 %

Hispanic or Latino

13.6 %

Black or African American

7.5 %

Foreign Languages Spoken

Spanish

52.9 %

French

9.3 %

Chinese

6.1 %
See More Demographics

Video Editor Education

Majors

Degrees

Bachelors

66.7 %

Associate

13.1 %

Certificate

10.2 %

Top Colleges for Video Editors

1. New York University

New York, NY • Private

In-State Tuition
$51,828
Enrollment
26,339

2. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Cambridge, MA • Private

In-State Tuition
$51,832
Enrollment
4,550

3. Northwestern University

Evanston, IL • Private

In-State Tuition
$54,568
Enrollment
8,451

4. Harvard University

Cambridge, MA • Private

In-State Tuition
$50,420
Enrollment
7,582

5. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Chapel Hill, NC • Private

In-State Tuition
$8,987
Enrollment
18,946

6. University of Southern California

Los Angeles, CA • Private

In-State Tuition
$56,225
Enrollment
19,548

7. Emory University

Atlanta, GA • Private

In-State Tuition
$51,306
Enrollment
6,975

8. University of Texas at Austin

Austin, TX • Private

In-State Tuition
$10,610
Enrollment
40,329

9. Texas State University

San Marcos, TX • Private

In-State Tuition
$10,280
Enrollment
34,187

10. Stanford University

Stanford, CA • Private

In-State Tuition
$51,354
Enrollment
7,083
See More Education Info

Online Courses For Video Editor That You May Like

Complete YouTube Course: Audio and Video Production at Home
udemy
4.5
(324)

Make Professional Youtube Videos at home - Video Production, Audio Production, OBS Screencasting, Premiere Pro + Editing...

Video Editing in Final Cut Pro X: Learn the Basics in 1 Hour
udemy
4.4
(590)

Learn editing with Final Cut Pro X in the shortest time. Perfect for the beginning editor or new content creator...

Video Editing with Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2021 for Beginners
udemy
4
(842)

Learn how to start editing videos in Adobe Premiere Pro CC with these simple follow along tutorials...

See more
Job type you want
Full Time
Part Time
Internship
Temporary

Top Skills For a Video Editor

The skills section on your resume can be almost as important as the experience section, so you want it to be an accurate portrayal of what you can do. Luckily, we've found all of the skills you'll need so even if you don't have these skills yet, you know what you need to work on. Out of all the resumes we looked through, 25.4% of video editors listed video production on their resume, but soft skills such as hand–eye coordination and physical stamina are important as well.

  • Video Production, 25.4%
  • Graphic Design, 10.9%
  • Adobe Creative Suite, 6.8%
  • Online, 6.7%
  • Youtube, 3.9%
  • Other Skills, 46.3%
  • See All Video Editor Skills

Best States For a Video Editor

Some places are better than others when it comes to starting a career as a video editor. The best states for people in this position are New Jersey, Alaska, New York, and Connecticut. Video editors make the most in New Jersey with an average salary of $65,005. Whereas in Alaska and New York, they would average $57,482 and $56,937, respectively. While video editors would only make an average of $52,210 in Connecticut, you would still make more there than in the rest of the country. We determined these as the best states based on job availability and pay. By finding the median salary, cost of living, and using the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Location Quotient, we narrowed down our list of states to these four.

1. Alaska

Total Video Editor Jobs:
20
Highest 10% Earn:
$93,000
Location Quotient:
1.15
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

2. New York

Total Video Editor Jobs:
863
Highest 10% Earn:
$95,000
Location Quotient:
3.22
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

3. Connecticut

Total Video Editor Jobs:
82
Highest 10% Earn:
$88,000
Location Quotient:
1.18
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here
View Full List

How Do Video Editor Rate Their Jobs?

Working as a Video Editor? Share your experience anonymously.
Rate
Do you work as a Video Editor?
Rate how you like work as Video Editor. It's anonymous and will only take a minute.
Rate

Top Video Editor Employers

1. CNN
4.8
Avg. Salary: 
$57,256
Video Editors Hired: 
40+
2. Comcast
4.6
Avg. Salary: 
$52,451
Video Editors Hired: 
27+
3. CBS
4.5
Avg. Salary: 
$60,693
Video Editors Hired: 
25+
4. Video Services
3.9
Avg. Salary: 
$53,240
Video Editors Hired: 
22+
5. ESPN
4.7
Avg. Salary: 
$60,944
Video Editors Hired: 
21+
6. Robert Half International
4.5
Avg. Salary: 
$47,581
Video Editors Hired: 
20+

Video Editor Videos