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Become A Volunteer Patient Representative

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Working As A Volunteer Patient Representative

  • Getting Information
  • Documenting/Recording Information
  • Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates
  • Performing for or Working Directly with the Public
  • Deal with People

  • Unpleasant/Angry People

  • Stressful

  • $44,741

    Average Salary

Example Of What A Volunteer Patient Representative does

  • Served as Zone Leader and Assistant to the Mission President Teaching and Training other leaders and missionaries
  • Organized and solicited parent and community membership.
  • Led thorough quantitative goal setting, reviewing past goals, learning new teaching/contact methods, and increasing team member morale.
  • Learned and taught in mandarin Chinese Administered over a free English program Performed community serve
  • Applied leadership skills by managing the daily activities of 10-15 representatives.
  • Trained new volunteers for three months as they arrived in Australia.
  • Involved in various community service projects such as fixing houses after the Nashville floods of 2010 Supervised 30 other volunteers
  • Organized daily volunteer activities and lesson plans.
  • Worked in several leadership positions managing groups of 20+ volunteers.
  • Translated for Spanish-speaking job seekers at LDS employment services.
  • Demonstrated dependability and hard work ethic while working 12-hour days.
  • Tasked with training new representatives.
  • Established ongoing relationships with the families and fellow volunteers
  • Managed a group of 16 missionaries and conducted weekly training meetings.
  • Selected to supervise and train 22 representatives in presentation skills.
  • Collected and compiled statistical information from each of the volunteers on a weekly basis.
  • Acquired interpersonal communication skills by talking with and teaching many people.
  • Created PowerPoint presentations and forms to support the committee s goals.
  • Served a two-year mission in California for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.
  • Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico

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How To Become A Volunteer Patient Representative

Requirements for social and human service assistants vary, although they typically have at least a high school diploma and must complete a brief period of on-the-job training. Some employers prefer to hire workers who have additional education or experience.

Education

Although a high school diploma is typically required, some employers prefer to hire workers who have relevant work experience or education beyond high school. A certificate or an associate’s degree in a subject such as human services, gerontology (working with older adults), or social or behavioral science is common for workers entering this occupation.

Human service degree programs train students to observe and interview patients, carry out treatment plans, and handle people who are undergoing a crisis. Many programs include fieldwork to give students hands-on experience.

The level of education that social and human service assistants have completed often determines the responsibilities they are given. Those with a high school diploma are likely to do lower level work, such as helping clients fill out paperwork. Assistants with some college education may coordinate program activities or manage a group home.

Although postsecondary education is important, some employers may prefer or allow for applicants who have related work experience. In some cases, candidates may substitute such experience in place of postsecondary education. 

Training

Many social and human service assistants, particularly those without any postsecondary education, undergo a period of on-the-job training. Because such workers often are dealing with multiple clients from a wide variety of backgrounds, on-the-job training in case management helps prepare them to respond appropriately to the different needs and situations of their clients.

Advancement

For social and human service assistants, additional education is almost always necessary for advancement. In general, advancement to case management or social work jobs requires a bachelor’s or master’s degree in human services, counseling, rehabilitation, social work, or a related field.

Important Qualities

Communication skills. Social and human service assistants talk with clients about the challenges in their lives and assist them in getting help. These workers must be able to listen to their clients and to communicate the clients’ needs to organizations that can help them.

Compassion. Social and human service assistants often work with people who are in stressful and difficult situations. To develop strong relationships, they must have compassion and empathy for their clients.

Interpersonal skills. Social and human service assistants must make their clients feel comfortable discussing sensitive issues. Assistants also need to build relationships with other service providers to become familiar with all of the resources that are available in their communities.

Organizational skills. Social and human service assistants often must complete lots of paperwork and work with many different clients. They must be organized in order to ensure that the paperwork is filed properly and that clients are getting the help they need.

Problem-solving skills. Social and human service assistants help clients find solutions to their problems. They must be able to listen carefully to their clients’ needs and offer practical solutions.

Time-management skills. Social and human service assistants often work with many clients. They must manage their time effectively to ensure that their clients are getting the attention they need.

Some employers require a criminal background check. In some settings, workers need a valid driver’s license.

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Volunteer Patient Representative jobs

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Volunteer Patient Representative Typical Career Paths

Volunteer Patient Representative Demographics

Gender

  • Male

    64.9%
  • Female

    31.9%
  • Unknown

    3.2%

Ethnicity

  • White

    79.4%
  • Hispanic or Latino

    10.1%
  • Asian

    8.2%
  • Unknown

    1.7%
  • Black or African American

    0.6%
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Languages Spoken

  • Spanish

    54.2%
  • French

    7.4%
  • Portuguese

    7.0%
  • Mandarin

    5.5%
  • Chinese

    5.5%
  • Japanese

    3.0%
  • Korean

    2.6%
  • Russian

    2.2%
  • German

    2.2%
  • Cantonese

    1.5%
  • Tagalog

    1.5%
  • Hindi

    1.1%
  • Italian

    1.1%
  • Tongan

    1.1%
  • Hmong

    1.1%
  • Tahitian

    0.7%
  • Thai

    0.7%
  • Cebuano

    0.7%
  • Swedish

    0.4%
  • Swahili

    0.4%
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Volunteer Patient Representative

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Volunteer Patient Representative Education

Volunteer Patient Representative

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Top Skills for A Volunteer Patient Representative

Latter-DaySaintsJesusChristLeadershipPositionsQuantitativeGoalSettingLeadershipSkillsCommunityServiceProjectsInterpersonalCommunicationSkillsNewVolunteersPublicSpeakingPresentationSkillsHourDaysFellowVolunteers70+Hours/WeekMandarinTrainingSessionsWeeklyBasisCommunityMembersPowerpointLDSBuildingRelationships

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Top Volunteer Patient Representative Skills

  1. Latter-Day Saints
  2. Jesus Christ
  3. Leadership Positions
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Volunteer for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints to promote its cause.
  • Served a two-year mission in California for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.
  • Learned Spanish and completed two year mission in Mexico Served in significant leadership positions and worked with local Hispanic populations
  • Led thorough quantitative goal setting, reviewing past goals, learning new teaching/contact methods, and increasing team member morale.
  • Applied leadership skills by managing the daily activities of 10-15 representatives.

Top Volunteer Patient Representative Employers

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