What is a Warehouse Worker

If you've ever stepped foot in a warehouse, you know how much trouble is can be around the corner. From forklifts to other fun (albeit dangerous) machinery just waiting to be ridden or played with, it's easy to get hurt. Usually, during work there's not a whole lot of time for play so, hopefully, that saves you from a hefty medical bill.

As a warehouse worker, you'll have plenty of work to keep your mind off that machinery. You'll need to receive and process any deliveries of stock or materials that come your way and you may also be in charge of filling out those delivery orders, as well as sending out some deliveries yourself.

While you'll probably only be working eight hours per shift, you may think this job is a breeze. Don't forget that standing around for that long and moving heavy items can take a toll. If you work as a warehouse worker, you'll need to make sure you're taking plenty of breaks during each shift, which I'm sure you'll happily agree to.

There is more than meets the eye when it comes to being a Warehouse Worker. For example, did you know that they make an average of $15.15 an hour? That's $31,519 a year!

Between 2018 and 2028, the career is expected to grow 1% and produce 46,900 job opportunities across the U.S.

What Does a Warehouse Worker Do

There are certain skills that many Warehouse Workers have in order to accomplish their responsibilities. By taking a look through resumes, we were able to narrow down the most common skills for a person in this position. We discovered that a lot of resumes listed Detail oriented, Math skills and Communication skills.

Learn more about what a Warehouse Worker does

How To Become a Warehouse Worker

If you're interested in becoming a Warehouse Worker, one of the first things to consider is how much education you need. We've determined that 9.6% of Warehouse Workers have a bachelor's degree. In terms of higher education levels, we found that 0.6% of Warehouse Workers have master's degrees. Even though some Warehouse Workers have a college degree, it's possible to become one with only a high school degree or GED.

Choosing the right major is always an important step when researching how to become a Warehouse Worker. When we researched the most common majors for a Warehouse Worker, we found that they most commonly earn High School Diploma degrees or Diploma degrees. Other degrees that we often see on Warehouse Worker resumes include Associate Degree degrees or Bachelor's Degree degrees.

You may find that experience in other jobs will help you become a Warehouse Worker. In fact, many Warehouse Worker jobs require experience in a role such as Cashier. Meanwhile, many Warehouse Workers also have previous career experience in roles such as Sales Associate or Customer Service Representative.

What is the right job for my career path?

Tell us your goals and we'll match you with the right jobs to get there.

And if you’re looking for a job, here are the five top employers hiring now:

  1. The Home Depot Jobs (1,151)
  2. Kohl's Jobs (522)
  3. Target Jobs (1,710)
  4. J. C. Penney Jobs (587)
  5. Walmart Jobs (2,158)
Average Salary
$31,519
Average Salary
Job Growth Rate
1%
Job Growth Rate
Job Openings
206,660
Job Openings
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Warehouse Worker Career Paths

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Average Salary for a Warehouse Worker

Warehouse Workers in America make an average salary of $31,519 per year or $15 per hour. The top 10 percent makes over $38,000 per year, while the bottom 10 percent under $26,000 per year.
Average Salary
$31,519
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How much should you be earning as an Warehouse Worker? Use Zippia's Salary Calculator to get an estimation of how much you should be earning.
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12 Warehouse Worker Resume Examples

Learn How To Write a Warehouse Worker Resume

At Zippia, we went through countless Warehouse Worker resumes and compiled some information about how to optimize them. Here are some suggestions based on what we found, divided by the individual sections of the resume itself.

View Warehouse Worker Resume Examples And Templates

And if you’re looking for a job, here are the five top employers hiring now:

  1. The Home Depot Jobs (1,151)
  2. Kohl's Jobs (522)
  3. Target Jobs (1,710)
  4. J. C. Penney Jobs (587)
  5. Walmart Jobs (2,158)

Choose From 10+ Customizable Warehouse Worker Resume templates

Zippia allows you to choose from different easy-to-use Warehouse Worker templates, and provides you with expert advice. Using the templates, you can rest assured that the structure and format of your Warehouse Worker resume is top notch. Choose a template with the colors, fonts & text sizes that are appropriate for your industry.

Warehouse Worker Resume
Warehouse Worker Resume
Warehouse Worker Resume
Warehouse Worker Resume
Warehouse Worker Resume
Warehouse Worker Resume
Warehouse Worker Resume
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Warehouse Worker Resume
Warehouse Worker Resume
Warehouse Worker Resume
Warehouse Worker Resume
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Warehouse Worker Resume
Warehouse Worker Resume

Warehouse Worker Demographics

Warehouse Worker Gender Distribution

Male
Male
78%
Female
Female
22%

After extensive research and analysis, Zippia's data science team found that:

  • Among Warehouse Workers, 21.7% of them are women, while 78.3% are men.

  • The most common race/ethnicity among Warehouse Workers is White, which makes up 60.4% of all Warehouse Workers.

  • The most common foreign language among Warehouse Workers is Spanish at 82.1%.

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Warehouse Worker Education

Warehouse Worker Majors

22.5 %

Warehouse Worker Degrees

High School Diploma

58.5 %

Diploma

14.2 %

Associate

11.8 %
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Online Courses For Warehouse Worker That You May Like

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Despite medical and technological advances, half of the world’s population lacks access to essential health services, and over 8.9 million preventable deaths occur every year. There is an acute global shortage of health workers, a gap that will grow to 18 million by 2030. Studies show that training high-performing community health workers can help close these gaps and save more than 3 million lives annually. In the past few decades, many community health worker programs across the world have...

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Top Skills For a Warehouse Worker

The skills section on your resume can be almost as important as the experience section, so you want it to be an accurate portrayal of what you can do. Luckily, we've found all of the skills you'll need so even if you don't have these skills yet, you know what you need to work on. Out of all the resumes we looked through, 12.4% of Warehouse Workers listed Customer Service on their resume, but soft skills such as Detail oriented and Math skills are important as well.

  • Customer Service, 12.4%
  • Pallet Jack, 7.9%
  • Customer Orders, 7.3%
  • Warehouse Environment, 7.0%
  • Communication, 5.6%
  • Other Skills, 59.8%

Best States For a Warehouse Worker

Some places are better than others when it comes to starting a career as a Warehouse Worker. The best states for people in this position are Illinois, Wyoming, Indiana, and Washington. Warehouse Workers make the most in Illinois with an average salary of $37,297. Whereas in Wyoming and Indiana, they would average $36,289 and $36,075, respectively. While Warehouse Workers would only make an average of $34,545 in Washington, you would still make more there than in the rest of the country. We determined these as the best states based on job availability and pay. By finding the median salary, cost of living, and using the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Location Quotient, we narrowed down our list of states to these four.

1. Indiana

Total Warehouse Worker Jobs:
2,478
Highest 10% Earn:
$43,000
Location Quotient:
1.43
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

2. Illinois

Total Warehouse Worker Jobs:
2,941
Highest 10% Earn:
$45,000
Location Quotient:
0.94
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

3. Utah

Total Warehouse Worker Jobs:
841
Highest 10% Earn:
$40,000
Location Quotient:
1
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here
Full List Of Best States For Warehouse Workers

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Top Warehouse Worker Employers

Most Common Employers For Warehouse Worker

RankCompanyZippia ScoreAverage Warehouse Worker SalaryAverage Salary
1$37,101
2$36,338
3$35,557
4$35,343
5$34,972
6$34,758

Warehouse Worker Videos

Becoming a Warehouse Worker FAQs

How long does it take to become a Warehouse Worker?

It takes 2 years of professional experience to become a warehouse worker. That is the time it takes to learn specific warehouse worker skills, but does not account for time spent in formal education.

Do you need a college degree to work in a warehouse?

No, you do not need a college degree to work in a warehouse. While the qualifications and skills you need to work in a warehouse will depend on the type of job you plan to pursue, most companies only require a high school diploma.

An entry-level laborer job requires a high school diploma or GED certificate. If you operate equipment, such as a forklift, you may need to undergo safety training from OSHA or earn an operator's license.

Some inventory or logistics specialist positions require an associate degree, although employers may accept equivalent job experience or professional certification such as a Certified Inventory Specialist (CIS).

Management-level careers may require a postsecondary degree in supply chain management or operations management and extensive experience.

Additional desirable skills could include:

  • Physical fitness

  • Mobility

  • Literacy and numeracy

  • Hand-eye coordination

  • Teamwork

  • Self-motivation

  • Previous warehouse experience

  • Forklift License (Reach / Counterbalance)

  • Computer literacy

  • Qualification in warehousing and storage (City Guilds Levels 1, 2, or 3)

How much should warehouse workers get paid?

Warehouse workers should be paid at least $16 an hour. Warehouses have typically paid less than factories but more than retailers. These haven't been highly skilled jobs but require a certain level of ability - whether managing inventory or driving a forklift without damaging goods and hurting anyone.

The sad fact is that many warehouse employees struggle to pay the bills, and more than 4,000 employees are on food stamps. Only Walmart, McDonald's, and some dollar-store chains have more workers requiring such assistance, according to the report, which said 70% of recipients work full-time.

As more warehouses open - at the rate of about one a day and with the demand for more competitive wages, we may expect to see an increase in salaries for warehouse workers in the years to come.

Is being a warehouse worker a good career?

No, being a warehouse worker is not a good career. The average warehouse worker makes $31,200 a year ($16 an hour). The sad fact is that many warehouse employees cannot support the cost of living on a warehouse salary.

Warehouse work is hard, but it also has its perks. You're not stuck behind a desk all day. You work with a diverse group of people. And because the demand for warehouse workers is steady, you'll always have opportunities, especially for temporary and seasonal hiring.

With that said, warehouse workers are in demand throughout numerous industries. The warehouse industry is continuously expanding. As e-commerce grows and online retail becomes more and more popular, warehouses are in increasingly high demand.

In addition, many entry-level warehouse jobs offer training in various desirable skills such as forklift or machine operation. These skills can lead to higher-paying, more specialized positions.

Is being a warehouse worker hard?

Yes, being a warehouse worker is hard. Working in a warehouse is not an easy task at all. It involves physical and technical work. Though it largely involves manual labor, it can be as fun and fulfilling as other jobs.

These types of jobs are best suited to individuals who can withstand physically demanding and often repetitive work. Typical warehouse activities involve lifting, sorting, and moving in ways that can be tiring and increase strain.

Many warehouses operate 24/7, which means you may be expected to work up to 12-hour shifts, and these shifts may be outside of regular business hours. And depending on where you work and the types of products you work with, you may also have to contend with extreme temperatures.

Not to mention some warehouse conditions can be difficult to work in. For example, cold storage and refrigerated warehouses keep groceries and other organic materials cold but also mean that workers have to face cold temperatures to perform their duties.

On the other extreme, outdoor loading bays can expose workers to the elements, which can get uncomfortable in the summer heat for those loading and unloading goods onto the transport vehicles.

What is the job title of a warehouse worker?

The job title of a warehouse worker is warehouse laborer. There are many different jobs within a warehouse, and each one has its own job titles and job duties.

Examples of common job titles and responsibilities for warehouse workers:

  • Warehouse packers - tasked with marking and labeling products. They also measure and weigh materials and examine all warehouse storage areas, containers, and packaging processes to ensure shipments are packed according to a company's specifications.

  • Production workers operate and maintain warehouse and factory equipment, such as conveyor lines, and assist with preparing materials for distribution. They check and assemble product parts and make sure all machinery and equipment are safe, functional, and run smoothly to help maximize the warehouse team's efficiency.

  • A stocker, or stock clerk, receives and unpacks merchandise shipments, labels them with tags or codes, and stocks shelves. They are responsible for scanning items and verifying the quality of merchandise before stocking.

  • A general warehouse laborer assists with various general warehouse tasks, including loading and unloading packages and materials, prepping worksites before projects begin, keeping work areas clear of debris and hazards, and preparing equipment for higher-level laborers.

  • Warehouse shift managers ensure warehouse activities run smoothly throughout their assigned shift. They're responsible for ensuring each shift is adequately staffed, equipment is functional, and the organization has the supplies necessary to complete planned activities.

What qualifications do you need to work in a warehouse?

The qualifications needed to work in a warehouse are a high school diploma, physical capabilities, and motivation. Most of the skills and safety qualifications needed to work in a warehouse will be learned on the job.

Ultimately the qualifications needed to work in a warehouse will depend on the type of job you plan to pursue. For an entry-level laborer job, for example, you will only have a high school diploma or GED certificate.

For those interested in operating equipment, such as a forklift, you will need to undergo safety training from OSHA or earn an operator's license.

Some inventory or logistics specialist positions require an associate degree, although employers may accept equivalent job experience or professional certification such as a Certified Inventory Specialist (CIS).

Management-level careers may require a postsecondary degree in supply chain management or operations management and extensive experience.

Other qualifications include being physically fit and able to stand on your feet for most of the day. Also, having a valid driver's license and being able to pass a drug test.

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