Log In

Log In to Save

Sign Up to Save

Sign Up to Dismiss

or

The email and password you specified are invalid. Please, try again.

Email and password are mandatory

Forgot Password?

Don't have an account? Sign Up

reset password

Enter your email address and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Back to Log In

Become A Weather Forecaster

Where do you want to work?

To get started, tell us where you'd like to work.
Sorry, we can't find that. Please try a different city or state.

Working As A Weather Forecaster

  • Analyzing Data or Information
  • Getting Information
  • Interacting With Computers
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
  • Processing Information
  • Mostly Sitting

  • Make Decisions

  • $97,070

    Average Salary

Example Of What A Weather Forecaster does

  • Compiled large amounts of multi-layered weather data daily.
  • Provided tactical weather support for U.S. Army Europe (USAREUR) Field Training Exercises (FTX) and contingencies.
  • Produced weather forecasts for aircrews, ground forces, at 29 DOD locations.
  • Provided precise flight weather briefings for domestic and international flights.
  • Operated Doppler Weather Radar System and assisted in analysis of radar data for any severe storm developments.
  • Recorded and transmitted weather observations and pilot reports via AWDS weather computer system.
  • Weather support of Army Combat Aviation Units in Kosovo and Iraq.
  • Provided timely and accurate 24 hour weather forecasts to support, and provide asset protection for operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.
  • Supervised 10 person team providing weather support to the largest aviation training wing in the USAF.
  • Analyzed meteorological data and developed 24 hour weather forecasts every 6 hours.
  • Studied weather patterns, made predictions and delivered forecasts on-air during the 10pm show.
  • Non-Commissioned Officer in Charge of Airfield Weather Operations.
  • Issued severe weather warnings to protect personnel and assets worth $30 billion across 11 state areas of the Western US.
  • provide forecast and observations for military aviators, produce weather products to minimize operational risk.
  • Liaised with weather stations and controllers about weather advisories for aircraft.
  • Created daily 5-day weather forecast on PowerPoint for base TV station.
  • Forecast onset of severe weather events to multi-national military, public, and scientific research organizations.
  • Awarded Air Force Commendation Medal and recognized as Supervisor of the Year for 2004.
  • Supervised a 4 person crew in daily weather forecasting operations and quality control checks.
  • Worked with local agencies to ensure that weather information to include Watches, Warnings, and Advisories were disseminated on time.

Show More

Show Less

How To Become A Weather Forecaster

Actuaries need a bachelor’s degree, typically in mathematics, actuarial science, statistics, or some other analytical field. Students must complete coursework in economics, applied statistics, and corporate finance, and must pass a series of exams to become certified professionals.

Education

Actuaries must have a strong background in mathematics, statistics, and business. Typically, an actuary has an undergraduate degree in mathematics, actuarial science, statistics, or some other analytical field.

To become certified professionals, students must complete coursework in economics, applied statistics, and corporate finance.

Students also should take classes outside of mathematics and business to prepare them for a career as an actuary. Coursework in computer science, especially programming languages, and the ability to use and develop spreadsheets, databases, and statistical analysis tools, are valuable. Classes in writing and public speaking will improve students’ ability to communicate in the business world.

Licenses, Certification, and Registrations

Two professional societies—the Casualty Actuarial Society (CAS) and the Society of Actuaries (SOA)—sponsor programs leading to full professional status. The CAS and SOA offer two levels of certification: associate and fellow.

The CAS certifies actuaries who work in the property and casualty field, which includes automobile, homeowners, medical malpractice, and workers’ compensation insurance.

The SOA certifies actuaries who work in life insurance, health insurance, retirement benefits, investments, and finance.

The main requirement for associate certification in each society is the completion of exams. The SOA requires that candidates pass five exams for associate (ASA) certification. The CAS requires that candidates pass seven exams for associate (ACAS) certification.

Many employers expect students to have passed at least one of the initial actuary exams needed for professional certification before graduation.

In addition, both CAS and SOA require that candidates take seminars on professionalism. Both societies have mandatory e-learning courses for candidates.

It typically takes 4 to 6 years for an actuary to get an ACAS or an ASA certification because each exam requires hundreds of hours of study and months of preparation.

After becoming associates, actuaries typically take another 2 to 3 years to earn fellowship status.

The SOA offers fellowship certification in five separate tracks: life and annuities, group and health benefits, retirement benefits, investments, and finance/enterprise risk management. Unlike the SOA, the CAS does not offer specialized study tracks for fellowship certification.

Both the CAS and the SOA have a continuing education requirement. Most actuaries meet this requirement by attending training seminars that are sponsored by their employers or the societies.

Pension actuaries typically must be licensed by the U.S. Department of Labor and U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries. Applicants must meet certain experience requirements and pass two exams administered through the SOA to qualify for enrollment.

Other Experience

Because there are different types of practice areas, including health, life, pension, and casualty, internships may be helpful for students deciding on which actuarial track to pursue.

Training

Most entry-level actuaries start out as trainees. They are typically on teams with more experienced actuaries who serve as mentors. At first, they perform basic tasks, such as compiling data, but as they gain more experience, they may conduct research and write reports. Beginning actuaries may spend time working in other departments, such as marketing, underwriting, and product development, to learn all aspects of the company’s work and how actuarial work applies to them.

Most employers support their actuaries throughout the certification process. For example, employers typically pay the cost of exams and study materials. Many firms provide paid time to study and encourage their employees to set up study groups. Employees usually receive raises or bonuses for each exam that they pass.

Advancement

Advancement depends largely on job performance and the number of actuarial exams passed. For example, actuaries who achieve fellowship status often supervise the work of other actuaries and provide advice to senior management. Actuaries with a broad knowledge of risk management and how it applies to business can rise to executive positions in their companies, such as chief risk officer or chief financial officer. 

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Actuaries use analytical skills to identify patterns and trends in complex sets of data to determine the factors that have an effect on certain types of events.

Communication skills. Actuaries must be able to explain complex technical matters to those without an actuarial background. They must also communicate clearly through the reports and memos that describe their work and recommendations.

Computer skills. Actuaries must know programming languages and be able to use and develop spreadsheets, databases, and statistical analysis tools.

Interpersonal skills. Actuaries serve as leaders and members of teams, so they must be able to listen to other people’s opinions and suggestions before reaching a conclusion.

Math skills. Actuaries quantify risk by using the principles of calculus, statistics, and probability.

Problem-solving skills. Actuaries identify risks and develop ways for businesses to manage those risks.

Show More

Show Less

Weather Forecaster jobs

Add To My Jobs

Weather Forecaster Typical Career Paths

Weather Forecaster Demographics

Gender

  • Male

    68.8%
  • Female

    29.6%
  • Unknown

    1.6%

Ethnicity

  • White

    81.0%
  • Hispanic or Latino

    8.7%
  • Asian

    7.8%
  • Unknown

    1.9%
  • Black or African American

    0.6%
Show More

Languages Spoken

  • Spanish

    36.8%
  • French

    10.5%
  • Swahili

    5.3%
  • Portuguese

    5.3%
  • Hindi

    5.3%
  • Nepali

    5.3%
  • Chinese

    5.3%
  • Turkish

    5.3%
  • Kinyarwanda

    5.3%
  • Persian

    5.3%
  • Arabic

    5.3%
  • Italian

    5.3%
Show More

Weather Forecaster

Unfortunately we don’t have enough data for this section.

Weather Forecaster Education

    Schools

    • Community College of the Air Force

      25.3%
    • Mississippi State University

      13.9%
    • Thomas Edison State University

      5.1%
    • University of Missouri - Columbia

      5.1%
    • Texas A&M University

      5.1%
    • American InterContinental University

      5.1%
    • University of South Florida

      3.8%
    • Pennsylvania State University

      3.8%
    • Park University

      3.8%
    • Millersville University of Pennsylvania

      3.8%
    • University of Maryland - University College

      2.5%
    • Southwestern College

      2.5%
    • Full Sail University

      2.5%
    • Liberty University

      2.5%
    • American University

      2.5%
    • State University of New York College at Oswego

      2.5%
    • Kennesaw State University

      2.5%
    • University of North Carolina at Greensboro

      2.5%
    • Colorado Technical University

      2.5%
    • University of Phoenix

      2.5%
    Show More

    Degrees

    • Bachelors

      43.4%
    • Masters

      20.3%
    • Other

      19.5%
    • Associate

      8.6%
    • Certificate

      5.5%
    • Doctorate

      2.0%
    • License

      0.4%
    • Diploma

      0.4%
    Show More

Weather Forecaster

Unfortunately we don’t have enough data for this section.

Job type you want
Full Time
Part Time
Internship
Temporary

Top Skills for A Weather Forecaster

MeteorologicalDataSpaceWeatherConditionsHourWeatherForecastsFlightWeatherBriefingsSevereWeatherEventsCombatWeatherSupportWeatherInformationWeatherDataWeatherWatchesDODSevereWeatherWarningsPowerpointMedalDailyWeatherWeatherProductsWeatherPatternsWeatherObservationsAirAssetsCommander

Show More

Top Weather Forecaster Skills

  1. Meteorological Data
  2. Space Weather Conditions
  3. Hour Weather Forecasts
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Analyzed meteorological data and developed 24 hour weather forecasts every 6 hours.
  • Performed and managed the collection, analysis, and forecast of atmospheric and space weather conditions.
  • Provided timely and accurate 24 hour weather forecasts to support, and provide asset protection for operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.
  • Operate around the clock to provide installation forecasts, flight weather briefings, and disseminate weather advisories, watches and warnings.
  • Forecast onset of severe weather events to multi-national military, public, and scientific research organizations.

Top Weather Forecaster Employers

Show More