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Average Salary
$35,254
Average Salary
Job Growth Rate
3%
Job Growth Rate
Job Openings
4,769
Job Openings

Welder Fitter Careers

Welder fitters fabricate layout and fit metal components to produce structural forms like bridge parts and pressure vessels. They do these by using their knowledge of welding techniques, metallurgy, and engineering requirements. You should be able to repair and install equipment like valves, floors, lead pipes, and tank linings. You will set up the welding equipment on-site and heat metal using your torch, and shape the material according to the design. More importantly, you will follow all safety protocols and clean up the workspace after completing the work.

A high school diploma with a professional certificate will be preferred as the educational requirement for a welder fitter. An experience in the role or related role will also be an added advantage. You will need physical strength to carry out the job of a welder fitter and the ability to read the blueprints being given with problem-solving skills. Welder fitters are paid an average of $17 hourly and about $35,254 yearly.

What Does a Welder Fitter Do

Welders, cutters, solderers, and brazers use hand-held or remotely controlled equipment to join or cut metal parts. They also fill holes, indentations, or seams of metal products.

Duties

Welders, cutters, solderers, and brazers typically do the following:

  • Study blueprints, sketches, or specifications
  • Calculate dimensions to be welded
  • Inspect structures or materials to be welded
  • Ignite torches or start power supplies
  • Monitor the welding process to avoid overheating
  • Maintain equipment and machinery

Welding is the most common way of permanently joining metal parts. In this process, heat is applied to metal pieces, melting and fusing them to form a permanent bond. Because of its strength, welding is used in shipbuilding, automobile manufacturing and repair, aerospace applications, and thousands of other manufacturing activities. Welding also is used to join steel beams in the construction of buildings, bridges, and other structures and to join pipes in pipelines, power plants, and refineries.

Welders work in a wide variety of industries, from car racing to manufacturing. The work that welders do and the equipment they use vary with the industry. Arc welding, the most common type of welding today, uses electrical currents to create heat and bond metals together—but there are more than 100 different processes that a welder can use. The type of weld normally is determined by the types of metals being joined and the conditions under which the welding is to take place.

Cutters use heat to cut and trim metal objects to specific dimensions. The work of arc, plasma, and oxy–gas cutters is closely related to that of welders. However, instead of joining metals, cutters use the heat from an electric arc, a stream of ionized gas called plasma, or burning gases to cut and trim metal objects to specific dimensions. Cutters also dismantle large objects, such as ships, railroad cars, automobiles, buildings, and aircraft. Some operate and monitor cutting machines similar to those used by welding machine operators.

Solderers and brazers also use heat to join two or more metal objects together. Soldering and brazing are similar, except that the temperature used to melt the filler metal is lower in soldering. Soldering uses metals with a melting point below 840 degrees Fahrenheit. Brazing uses metals with a higher melting point. 

Soldering and brazing workers use molten metal to join two pieces of metal. However, the metal added during the soldering or brazing process has a melting point lower than that of the piece, so only the added metal is melted, not the piece. Therefore, these processes normally do not create distortions or weaknesses in the piece, as can occur with welding.

Soldering commonly is used to make electrical and electronic circuit boards, such as computer chips. Soldering workers tend to work with small pieces that must be positioned precisely.

Brazing often is used to connect cast iron and thinner metals that the higher temperatures of welding would warp. Brazing also can be used to apply coatings to parts in order to reduce wear and protect against corrosion.

How To Become a Welder Fitter

A high school diploma or equivalent combined with technical and on-the-job training is typically required to become a welder, cutter, solderer, or brazer.

Education & Training

A high school diploma or equivalent combined with technical and on-the-job training is typically required to become a welder, cutter, solderer, or brazer. High school technical education courses and postsecondary institutions, such as vocational–technical institutes, community colleges, and private welding, soldering, and brazing schools offer formal technical training. In addition, the U.S. Armed Forces operate welding and soldering schools.

Courses in blueprint reading, shop mathematics, mechanical drawing, physics, chemistry, and metallurgy are helpful.

An understanding of electricity also is helpful, and knowledge of computers is gaining importance as welding, soldering, and brazing machine operators become more responsible for programming robots and other computer-controlled machines.

Although numerous employers are willing to hire inexperienced entry-level workers and train them on the job, many prefer to hire workers who have been through training or credentialing programs. Even entry-level workers with formal technical training still receive several months of on-the-job training.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Courses leading to certification are offered at many welding schools. For example, the American Welding Society offers the Certified Welder and Certified Welding Fabricator designations.

Some welding positions require general certification in welding or certification in specific skills, such as Certified Welding Inspector or Certified Robotic Arc Welding.

The Institute for Printed Circuits offers certification and training in soldering. In industries such as aerospace and defense, which need highly skilled workers, many employers require these certifications. Certification can show mastery of lead-free soldering techniques, which are important to many employers.

Some employers pay the cost of training and testing for employees.

Important Qualities

Detail oriented. Welders, cutters, solderers, and brazers perform precision work, often with straight edges and minimal flaws. The ability to see details and characteristics of the joint and detect changes in molten metal flows requires good eyesight and attention to detail.

Manual dexterity. Welders, cutters, solderers, and brazers must have a steady hand to hold a torch in one place. Workers must also have good hand-eye coordination.

Physical stamina. The ability to endure long periods of standing or repetitious movements is important for welders, cutters, solderers, and brazers.

Physical strength. Welders, cutters, solderers, and brazers must be in good physical condition. They often must lift heavy pieces of metal and move welding or cutting equipment, and sometimes bend, stoop, or reach while working.

Spatial-orientation skills. Welders, cutters, solderers, and brazers must be able to read, understand, and interpret two- and three-dimensional diagrams in order to fit metal products correctly.

Technical skills. Welders, cutters, solderers, and brazers must be able to operate manual or semiautomatic welding equipment to fuse metal segments.

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Average Salary
$35,254
Average Salary
Job Growth Rate
3%
Job Growth Rate
Job Openings
4,769
Job Openings

Welder Fitter Career Paths

Top Careers Before Welder Fitter

Welder
57.1 %

Top Careers After Welder Fitter

Welder
52.2 %

Welder Fitter Jobs You Might Like

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Average Salary for a Welder Fitter

Welder Fitters in America make an average salary of $35,254 per year or $17 per hour. The top 10 percent makes over $44,000 per year, while the bottom 10 percent under $27,000 per year.
Average Salary
$35,254
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Best Paying Cities

City
ascdesc
Average Salarydesc
Kent, WA
Salary Range40k - 60k$50k$49,654
Kearny, NJ
Salary Range37k - 53k$45k$44,616
San Carlos, CA
Salary Range33k - 54k$43k$42,549
Portland, OR
Salary Range34k - 52k$42k$42,140
New York, NY
Salary Range33k - 48k$40k$40,371
Rockville, MD
Salary Range33k - 46k$39k$39,288
$24k
$60k

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Welder Fitter Resumes

Designing and figuring out what to include on your resume can be tough, not to mention time-consuming. That's why we put together a guide that is designed to help you craft the perfect resume for becoming a Welder Fitter. If you're needing extra inspiration, take a look through our selection of templates that are specific to your job.

Learn How To Write a Welder Fitter Resume

At Zippia, we went through countless Welder Fitter resumes and compiled some information about how best to optimize them. Here are some suggestions based on what we found, divided by the individual sections of the resume itself.

View Detailed Information

Welder Fitter Demographics

Gender

male

91.2 %

female

6.0 %

unknown

2.8 %

Ethnicity

White

68.3 %

Hispanic or Latino

15.9 %

Black or African American

10.0 %

Foreign Languages Spoken

Spanish

69.8 %

Russian

4.3 %

Polish

4.3 %
See More Demographics

Welder Fitter Education

Majors

Degrees

Certificate

43.4 %

High School Diploma

26.4 %

Associate

12.7 %
See More Education Info

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Top Skills For a Welder Fitter

The skills section on your resume can be almost as important as the experience section, so you want it to be an accurate portrayal of what you can do. Luckily, we've found all of the skills you'll need so even if you don't have these skills yet, you know what you need to work on. Out of all the resumes we looked through, 15.1% of welder fitters listed mig on their resume, but soft skills such as detail oriented and manual dexterity are important as well.

Best States For a Welder Fitter

Some places are better than others when it comes to starting a career as a welder fitter. The best states for people in this position are Alaska, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Washington. Welder fitters make the most in Alaska with an average salary of $55,036. Whereas in Connecticut and Rhode Island, they would average $50,354 and $49,864, respectively. While welder fitters would only make an average of $49,362 in Washington, you would still make more there than in the rest of the country. We determined these as the best states based on job availability and pay. By finding the median salary, cost of living, and using the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Location Quotient, we narrowed down our list of states to these four.

1. Alaska

Total Welder Fitter Jobs:
16
Highest 10% Earn:
$61,000
Location Quotient:
1.85
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

2. Rhode Island

Total Welder Fitter Jobs:
15
Highest 10% Earn:
$71,000
Location Quotient:
1.19
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here

3. Washington

Total Welder Fitter Jobs:
93
Highest 10% Earn:
$72,000
Location Quotient:
1.23
Location Quotient is a measure used by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to determine how concentrated a certain industry is in a single state compared to the nation as a whole. You can read more about how BLS calculates location quotients here
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Top Welder Fitter Employers

1. Trinity Industries
4.5
Avg. Salary: 
$37,682
Welder Fitters Hired: 
213+
2. Tradesmen International
4.5
Avg. Salary: 
$40,026
Welder Fitters Hired: 
125+
3. Aerotek
4.0
Avg. Salary: 
$35,851
Welder Fitters Hired: 
110+
4. Caterpillar
4.7
Avg. Salary: 
$44,330
Welder Fitters Hired: 
79+
5. FWT
3.7
Avg. Salary: 
$38,390
Welder Fitters Hired: 
72+
6. Schuff Steel Company
4.0
Avg. Salary: 
$39,596
Welder Fitters Hired: 
72+

Welder Fitter Videos

Updated October 2, 2020