Wilson Sporting Goods Co. Company History Timeline

(118 Jobs)
1913

Originally known as the Ashland Manufacturing Company, Wilson Sporting Goods […] Incorporated in 1913, the company was originally established to find unique ways of using slaughterhouse byproducts of a nearby meat-packing firm.

Wilson Sporting Goods was incorporated in 1913 as the Ashland Manufacturing Company, and was originally established to find unique ways of using slaughterhouse byproducts of a nearby meat-packing firm, its parent company owned by Sulzberger and Schwarzchild.

Then in 1913, Wilson & Company, a meatpacking plant in Chicago, began using discarded slaughter house byproducts to create strings for tennis rackets, violins and sutures for surgeons.

Wholly Owned Subsidiary of Amer Sports Corporation Incorporated: 1913 as Ashland Manufacturing CompanyNAIC: 339920 Sporting and Athletic Good Manufacturing

Wilson Sporting Goods was incorporated in 1913 as the Ashland Manufacturing Company.

Sulzberger & Son's founded the "Ashland Manufacturing Company" in 1913 to use animal by-products from its slaughterhouses.

1914

By 1914, the company was producing such items as tennis racket strings, violin strings, and surgical sutures, and it had expanded into baseball shoes and tennis rackets.

By 1914, the company was producing such items as tennis racket strings, violin strings, and surgical sutures, and had expanded into baseball shoes and tennis racquets.

It started out in 1914, making tennis racket strings, violin strings, and surgical sutures, but soon expanded into baseball shoes and tennis racquets.

1916

Wilson, a hard-headed businessman who saw the potential of a sporting goods company, broke away from the parent firm of Sulzberger and Schwarzchild, began to focus exclusively on the manufacture of sporting and athletic equipment, and then named the company after himself in 1916.

In 1916, he renamed the company exclusively after himself.

Wilson, a hardheaded businessman who saw the potential of a sporting-goods company, broke away from the parent firm of Sulzberger and Schwarzchild, began to focus exclusively on the manufacture of sporting and athletic equipment, and then named the company after himself in 1916.

1917

In 1917, the company was so confident in the quality of its product line that it announced a two-year unconditional guarantee on all of its products.

1918

Although Thomas E. Wilson left the company in 1918, no interruption occurred in either the manufacture of its products or the growth of its revenues.

Early History. , In 1918, Wilson left to concentrate on the beef-packing business, changing the Sulzberger company to Wilson & Co. (which would ultimately become Iowa Beef Packers and then be taken over by Tyson Foods). Edit.

Although Thomas Wilson left the company in 1918, no interruption occurred in either the manufacture of its products or the growth of its revenues.

1919

1919 - A distribution agreement with Western Sporting Goods boosts the Wilson reputation as a premier supplier of uniforms, and Wilson becomes the official supplier of the Chicago Cubs. , A Wilson volleyball "co-starred" alongside Tom Hanks in the film Cast Away.

1920

And, although Bible was able to help Wilson develop helmets and shoulder pads, the company was unable to match the degree of influence on the game achieved with Rockne during the 1920s.

1922

In 1922, Wilson introduced the Ray Schalk catcher's mitt, which from that time onward set the standard for design, comfort, and padding within the baseball industry.

In 1922, it introduced the Ray Schalk catcher's mitt which later became the standard. , Under new president Lawrence Blaine Icely, it acquired the "Chicago Sporting Goods Company" and struck a deal to supply the Chicago Cubs.

In 1922, Wilson introduced the Ray Schalk catcher’s mitt, which from that time onward set the standard for design, comfort, and padding within the baseball industry.

In 1922, it introduced the Ray Schalk catcher's mitt which later became the standard.

1925

In 1925, it was renamed "Wilson-Western Sporting Goods" following a distribution agreement with "Western Sporting Goods".

1926

In 1926, he created one of the most recognizable sports brand names in the world, known as Wilson Sporting Goods.

1931

When Knute Rockne died in a plane crash in 1931, Wilson was able to form a close collaboration with Dana X. Bible, the football coach at the University of Nebraska, in an attempt to continue its development of innovative football products.

In 1931, it renamed itself Wilson Sporting Goods Company.

1932

In 1932, the company developed the R-90, a sand wedge golf club inspired by Gene Sarazen's victory in the 1932 British Open.

In 1932, the company developed the R-90, a sand wedge golf club inspired by Gene Sarazen’s victory in the 1932 British Open.

After Rockne's death, the company focused on golf, introducing the R-90, a sand wedge golf club inspired by Gene Sarazen's victory in the 1932 British Open.

1937

In 1937, Wilson signed the soon-to-be-famous Sam Sneed as a member of the firm's advisory committee, and introduced the Blue Ridge Golf Clubs, named after the region in Virginia where Sneed was born.

1939

In 1939, Wilson achieved a major innovation in the design and manufacture of golf clubs with its ability to bond different layers and types of wood together to produce a criss-cross pattern that resulted in more power, better direction, and a longer period of use than previous designs.

1941

Horween Leather Company has supplied Wilson with pebbled cowhide since 1941 for use in the manufacture of footballs and basketballs.

In 1941, Wilson became official provider of game balls for the National Football League (American football), a partnership that continues to this day.

1945

The fire started at about … Having remained at the forefront of sports equipment and uniform manufacturers, after the war ended in 1945 the company began to expand and grow dramatically.

Having remained at the forefront of sports equipment and uniform manufacturers, after the war ended in 1945 the company began to expand and grow dramatically.

1946

Wilson became the official NBA ball supplier in 1946, in a partnership that would last 37 years.. The former Wilson Sporting Goods warehouse in Cookeville was destroyed by a fire early this morning.

1950

L. B. Icely died in 1950, but the company continued to expand.

1955

In 1955, it acquired Ohio-Kentucky Manufacturing for making footballs. learn how over 7,000 companies got started! Current Wilson Staff players include British Open and PGA Championship champion Pádraig Harrington, and United States Open champion Gary Woodland.

In 1955, it acquired Ohio-Kentucky Manufacturing for making footballs.

1957

In 1957, the company constructed its own administrative office facility in River Grove, Illinois, a short distance from Chicago's downtown area.

In 1957, the company constructed its own administrative office facility in River Grove, Illinois, a short distance from Chicago’s downtown area.

1964

In 1964, Wilson acquired "Wonder Products Company", which made toys and custom-molded items.

In 1964, Wilson purchased Wonder Products Company, a firm with a seemingly unrelated product line of toys and custom-molded items.

In 1964, it acquired Wonder Products Company, which made toys and custom-molded items.

1967

Crenshaw's even received the moniker Little Ben due to his proficiency with it[citation needed]. In 1967, however, a major change occurred when Wilson Sporting Goods was purchase by the aerospace conglomerate Ling-Temco-Vought (LTV Corporation), located in Dallas, Texas.

The packing company continued to have control in the company until 1967 when it was sold to Ling-Temco-Vought.

In 1967, the company was acquired by Ling-Temco-Vought.

In 1967, however, a major change occurred when Wilson Sporting Goods was purchased by the aerospace conglomerate Ling-Temco-Vought (LTV Corporation), located in Dallas, Texas.

In 1967, however, a major change occurred when Wilson Sporting Goods was purchase by the aerospace conglomerate Ling-Temco-Vought (LTV Corporation), located in Dallas, Texas.

1970

Stronger and lighter than wood, it became a top seller, and Jimmy Connors became its most famous user, playing at the top of men's professional tennis for much of the 1970's using the long-throated, small-headed steel frame.

In 1970, the company was acquired by PepsiCo, Inc., who wanted to take advantage of Wilson's high profile and leadership role in the industry in order to enhance its own image.

In 1970, the company was acquired by PepsiCo, Inc., which wanted to take advantage of Wilson's high profile and leadership role in the industry in order to enhance its own image.

In 1970, the company was acquired by PepsiCo, Inc., who wanted to take advantage of Wilson’s high profile and leadership role in the industry in order to enhance its own image.

1976

By 1976, Wilson opened a manufacturing plant in Galway, Ireland, to enter the rapidly growing market for tennis products.

By 1976, Wilson had opened a manufacturing plant in Galway, Ireland, to enter the rapidly growing market for tennis products.

1979

In 1979, Wilson tennis balls were first used in the US Open, and still are used to this day.

1985

In September 1985, Wilson Sporting Goods was acquired by Westray Capital Corporation through one of its affiliates, WSGC Holdings, Inc.

In 1985, Wilson was acquired by Westray Capital Corporation through subsidiary WSGC Holdings. with slightly rounded frame edges) but with different paint work.

Due to its position in the marketplace, and its growing presence overseas, Wilson Sporting Goods was purchased by WSGC Holdings, Inc. in 1985.

In 1985, Wilson was acquired by Westray Capital Corporation through subsidiary WSGC Holdings.

1989

In March 1989, WSGC Holdings merged with Bogey Acquisitions Company.

In 1989, WSGC merged with Bogey Acquisitions Company, which is affiliated with the Finnish group Amer Sports.

A 1989 merger between WSGC Holdings and Bogey Acquisition Company, an affiliate of the Amer Group Ltd., resulted in Wilson Sporting Goods becoming a wholly owned subsidiary of the Amer Group, located in Helsinki, Finland.

1990

The revolutionary Hammer 2.7si tennis racket, introduced in 1990, soon became one of the industry's top-selling rackets.

The revolutionary Hammer 2.7si tennis racquet, introduced in 1990, soon became one of the industry’s top-selling racquets.

1991

Jim Courier and Stefan Edberg also used the Pro Staff Original, Edberg later switching to the Pro Staff Classic in 1991, which was the same racket (85 sq.

1993

The new Conform baseball glove was brought out in 1993, which allowed ballplayers to customize a glove to the contours of their hand.

1994

In 1994, the company introduced the Jet basketball, a leather version made specifically for the outdoor market.

1995

In the field of golf, in 1995 Wilson introduced the Invex driver, a uniquely designed head made from stainless steel and titanium, which almost overnight became the largest selling of all the firm's golf clubs to date.

In the field of golf, in 1995 Wilson introduced the Invex driver, a uniquely designed head made from stainless steel and titanium, which almost overnight became the largest selling of all the firm’s golf clubs to date.

1996

Jim Baugh, appointed president in 1996, differed from his predecessors in that he had spent 20 years in the sporting-goods business prior to becoming president, and he was credited with much of the recent successes of Wilson's racquet sports division.

1999

While the golf division had faltered, the team sports product lines performed well—with sales increasing 11 percent in 1999—in part because of the key alliances Wilson had made.

2000

In January 2000 Wilson made an acquisition that further fortified the team sports division: the company acquired DeMarini Sports, maker of premium, high-performance softball and baseball bats.

Fernandez, Bob, "Sports Equipment Makers Hit Hard As Americans Become More Sedentary," Philadelphia Inquirer, June 18, 2000.

"Wilson Sporting Goods and the NFL Renew Their Partnership," PR Newswire, August 21, 2000.

2003

When tennis equipment sales also began to plummet in early 2003, Amer Group took drastic measures, beginning with the resignation of Wilson CEO Jim Baugh.

2004

In the spring of 2004 Wilson won a minor but significant victory when the Amateur Softball Association issued a ruling that banned many of Wilson's competitors' high-performance bats but allowed Wilson's equipment to remain legal.

2005

In 2005 Wilson Staff claims to be the first golf company to utilize nanotechnology in golf equipment.

Late in 2005, Chris Considine, formerly president of the Team Sports unit, became the president of Wilson Sporting Goods, overseeing both of the operating divisions.

2006

In 2006, the Australian Open began using Wilson Tennis Balls.

2019

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2020

Aside from tennis rackets, the Wilson sporting goods company also makes tennis balls (including the official balls of the US Open and starting in 2020, the French Open major championships), shoes, balls, strings, clothes, and racquet bags.

18, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Wilson Advisory Staff Member and global tennis icon Serena Williams and Wilson Sporting Goods Co., revealed today the new Blade SW102 Autograph racket.

2021

Derdak, Thomas; Galens, Judy "Wilson Sporting Goods Company ." International Directory of Company Histories. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 15, 2021). https://www.encyclopedia.com/books/politics-and-business-magazines/wilson-sporting-goods-company

Derdak, Thomas; Galens, Judy "Wilson Sporting Goods Company ." International Directory of Company Histories. . Retrieved April 15, 2021 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/books/politics-and-business-magazines/wilson-sporting-goods-company

"Wilson Sporting Goods Company ." International Directory of Company Histories. . Encyclopedia.com. (April 15, 2021). https://www.encyclopedia.com/books/politics-and-business-magazines/wilson-sporting-goods-company-0

"Wilson Sporting Goods Company ." International Directory of Company Histories. . Retrieved April 15, 2021 from Encyclopedia.com: https://www.encyclopedia.com/books/politics-and-business-magazines/wilson-sporting-goods-company-0

Founded
1913
Company Founded
Headquarters
Chicago, IL
Company Headquarter
Founders
Thomas Wilson
Company Founders

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