Log In

Log In to Save

Sign Up to Save

Sign Up to Dismiss

or

The email and password you specified are invalid. Please, try again.

Email and password are mandatory

Forgot Password?

Don't have an account? Sign Up

reset password

Enter your email address and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Back to Log In

Become A Work Force Advisor

Where do you want to work?

To get started, tell us where you'd like to work.
Sorry, we can't find that. Please try a different city or state.

Working As A Work Force Advisor

  • Assisting and Caring for Others
  • Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates
  • Making Decisions and Solving Problems
  • Getting Information
  • Deal with People

  • Unpleasant/Angry People

  • $44,262

    Average Salary

Example Of What A Work Force Advisor does

  • Interview clients, document information gathered using data entry skills in the computer programs.
  • Interviewed clients to determine eligibility for the Food Stamp, Medicaid and/or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families programs.
  • Determined workforce requirements to meet service level and response time objectives.
  • Obtained, verified, and calculated income and resources to determine client financial eligibility.
  • Calculate and processes changes to client benefits such as overpayments, adjustments, or restoration of benefits.
  • Process changes to client status, overpayment, adjusts or restores benefits.
  • Gathered and verified financial and personal information to determine/ re-determine eligibility for SNAP, TANF, CHIP and Medicaid programs.
  • Communicated with coworkers and clients to provide information, answer inquiries, address issues and resolve problems.
  • Process changes to client status, overpayments, and adjust or restore benefits.
  • Determined eligibility for social services programs (SNAP, Medicaid/TANF).
  • Utilized Oracle, TIERS, and Microsoft Office.
  • Performed complex customer service functions in a call center environment; handled escalated, delegated case actions and policy issues.
  • Determine Eligibility for SNAP, MA, CMA, PW & TANF Programs
  • Case management reviews to determine or verify new and program eligibility.
  • Work diligently to complete case load for needy families.
  • Communicate on an intermediate level with other (internally o externally) to provide exchange or verify information.
  • Obtained, verifies and calculates income and resources to determine client financial eligibility.
  • Determine client benefits, verify case data, and explain program benefits and requirements.
  • Conduct client interviews via phone and/or in person.
  • Certify program eligibility, computes benefit levels, and determines the length of eligibility.

Show More

Show Less

How To Become A Work Force Advisor

Most school counselors must have a master’s degree in school counseling or a related field and have a state-issued credential. Some employers prefer that career counselors have a master’s degree. Career counselors who work in private practices may also need a license.

Education

Most states require school counselors to have a master’s degree in school counseling or a related field. Programs in school counseling teach students about fostering academic development; conducting group and individual counseling; working with parents, school staff, and community organizations; and using data to develop, implement, and evaluate comprehensive school counseling programs for all students. These programs often require students to gain experience through an internship or practicum.

Some employers prefer that career counselors have a master’s degree in counseling with a focus on career development. Career counseling programs prepare students to assess clients’ skills and interests and to teach career development techniques. Many programs require students to have a period of supervised experience, such as an internship.  

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Public school counselors must have a state-issued credential to practice. This credential can be called a certification, a license, or an endorsement, depending on the state. Licensure or certification typically requires a master’s degree in school counseling and an internship or practicum completed under the supervision of a licensed professional school counselor.

Some states require applicants to have 1 to 2 years of classroom teaching experience, or to hold a teaching license, prior to being certified. Most states require a criminal background check as part of the credentialing process. Information about requirements for each state is available from the American School Counselor Association.

Although some employers prefer to hire licensed career counselors, licensure is not required by all states. Contact information for state regulating boards is available from the National Board for Certified Counselors.

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

Although most states do not require work experience in a related occupation, some states require school counselors to have 1 to 2 years of classroom teaching experience, or to hold a teaching license, prior to being certified. Please see the Similar Occupations tab for more information on teaching occupations.

Important Qualities

Compassion. School and career counselors often work with people who are dealing with stressful and difficult situations, so they must be compassionate and empathize with their clients and students.

Interpersonal skills. School and career counselors must be able to work with different types of people. They spend most of their time working directly with clients, students, or other professionals and need to form and maintain good working relationships.

Listening skills. Good listening skills are essential for school and career counselors. They need to give their full attention to students and clients in order to understand their problems.

Speaking skills. School and career counselors must communicate effectively with clients and students. They should express ideas and information in a way that their clients and students understand easily.

Show More

Show Less

Work Force Advisor jobs

Add To My Jobs

Work Force Advisor Typical Career Paths

Work Force Advisor Demographics

Gender

  • Female

    69.6%
  • Male

    28.7%
  • Unknown

    1.8%

Ethnicity

  • White

    71.9%
  • Hispanic or Latino

    20.7%
  • Asian

    5.3%
  • Unknown

    1.4%
  • Black or African American

    0.7%
Show More

Languages Spoken

  • Spanish

    82.2%
  • Portuguese

    4.1%
  • Arabic

    4.1%
  • Swedish

    1.4%
  • Kurdish

    1.4%
  • German

    1.4%
  • Dari

    1.4%
  • Persian

    1.4%
  • Hmong

    1.4%
  • Italian

    1.4%
Show More

Work Force Advisor

Unfortunately we don’t have enough data for this section.

Work Force Advisor Education

Work Force Advisor

Unfortunately we don’t have enough data for this section.

Job type you want
Full Time
Part Time
Internship
Temporary

Top Skills for A Work Force Advisor

FinancialEligibilityMedicaidProgramsTanfProgramBenefitsTemporaryAssistanceClientInterviewsAddressIssuesCalculatesIncomeClientStatusProcessesChangesRestoresBenefitsIntermediateLevelComputesBenefitLevelsRoutineEligibilityDeterminationsNeedyFamiliesCustomerServiceTiersSocialServicesProgramsDataEntryProgramEligibility

Show More

Top Work Force Advisor Skills

  1. Financial Eligibility
  2. Medicaid Programs
  3. Tanf
You can check out examples of real life uses of top skills on resumes here:
  • Obtain, verified, and calculate income and resources to determine client financial eligibility for social service programs.
  • Determined eligibility for Food Stamps and/or Medicaid Programs.
  • Determined eligibility for Temporary Assistance for Needy families (TANF), SNAP, and Texas Works Medicaid Programs.
  • Involved interviewing clients, documenting information gathered, determining benefits, verifying case data, explaining program benefits/requirements.
  • Provided temporary assistance to low income families.

Top Work Force Advisor Employers

Show More