The Best LinkedIn Profiles We Could Find On The Internet

By Chris Kolmar - Dec. 4, 2020

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What is your relationship with your LinkedIn profile? No, you don’t have to answer that question. We think we know the answer already. Too many people let their LinkedIn account flounder. They uploaded a resume, and it’s got a rough outline that you created years ago. And it just sits there, not doing you much good.

Take it a step further; do you have a personal webpage? How much energy are you putting into that page when you compare it to your LinkedIn page? The truth of the matter is that you should be putting as much, if not more, energy into your LinkedIn page. That’s right; LinkedIn is more important than your personal webpage. So much so that you should add your LinkedIn page to your resume.

Why LinkedIn Matters

If you’re looking for a job, a great LinkedIn page can have recruiters and hiring managers coming to you. In fact, if you start with your summary and just rewrite that, you might catch the attention of your dream job recruiter.

The LinkedIn summary is the text box at the top of your profile, just below your photo. Consider it your elevator pitch of professional awesomeness.

LinkedIn is where people go to find talent. Let that sink in for a minute. Why aren’t you putting your best effort into the place where you’ll be seen. It’s like being in a talent competition but only singing backstage. You need to shine where/when people are watching.

Now that you’re motivated to update your LinkedIn profile, let’s look at some great ones, so you have winning ideas.

LinkedIn Profile Examples

Stephey’s LinkedIn Profile

I’m an Executive Assistant at a major insurance firm. It’s a great job that nobody else wants to have. There is a lot to know across the entire company, and everything needs to keep running smoothly. I’m everyone’s go-to, and it takes tremendous skill and knowledge to stay on top of every department. It’s a hard job, and I love it.

I’m obsessed with categorizing and organizing. Staying on top of everything in a large company takes a ridiculous amount of skill and an even greater amount of filing. It’s not just my dedication to organization that keeps everyone coming back to me, but it’s also my commitment to the company and my teammates. I enjoy helping people out and understanding the whole process of what we do for our customers.

When I’m not at work, I’m usually thinking about work or ways to do my job even more efficiently. I’m that obsessed with the job and being the best Executive Assistant that I can be. I was born to help others, and I think I’ve found a perfect way to brighten the day of everyone I come in contact with.

Job type you want
Full Time
Part Time
Internship
Temporary

My organizing ideas have spilled over into my personal life, and I’ve become an expert at closet organization. So much so, I started re-organizing the closets of all of my friends and family members. It got so obsessive that I started my own closet organization business. If you need my help, just reach out, and I’d be happy to do a virtual consultation.

  • Why It’s Great:

    • She takes a job that’s often underrated and admits it but then proves her value.

    • Her enthusiasm for her job and her work shines through.

    • She slips in her side job in a very authentic way, and at this point, we believe she’s an expert.

Bob’s LinkedIn Profile

I find great people and then get them careers that match. Open the dialogue with me, and we’ll discover what makes you tick, what you value, and what your true goals are. If your current career or employer doesn’t align with what you want, then it’s time to make a change, and I’ll help you do that.

I’m a recruiter with heart. I don’t just live and die by the numbers (even when there’s a dollar sign in front of them). I truly want to help people find careers that inspire them to get up every morning and go to work. I know that these people are the ones who bring more than an education and experience to a job – they bring joy. These are the people who companies want to keep and keep promoting. It’s all about job satisfaction, and when my clients are satisfied, then I am, too.

My specialty is sales and engineering and, if you’re a top performer in those fields, I want to have a conversation with you.

  • Why It’s Great:

    • Bob describes what he does without having to give a job title.

    • You feel his passion in the second paragraph, and it’s compelling.

    • He calls out top professionals and lists his specialties.

    • By asking for a conversation or a dialogue, he’s using a soft-sell approach.

Mary’s LinkedIn Profile

I am obsessed with aviation.

I always thought I would end up on the nightly news. I went to school to be a reporter and worked for the local news channel in college. And then I did a story on aviation, and I was hooked.

Something about the freedom to travel, to hop in a plane and fly, something about the realization of dreams sparked my interest and instantly prompted me to return to school – this time to learn to fly. Since then, I’ve earned my private pilot’s license and my commercial pilot’s license. I now work as a freelance corporate jet pilot based out of St. Louis.

I love flying, and meeting new people with every job is an added bonus. There’s nothing quite like the satisfaction of making that connection with new people and helping them get where they want to go. Whether they are headed somewhere for business or pleasure, it’s always a joy for me to fly. And getting paid for it is the icing on the cake.

  • Why It’s Great:

    • Mary has a fun, quick opening sentence that sums her up, professionally and personally.

    • Her career switch is interesting and understandable. It also explains some gaps in her professional pursuits.

    • Her personality shines through, and it’s easy to see why people would be interested in her services.

Marvin’s LinkedIn Profile

I think I was probably gaming before I could even talk. Maybe I even made a game of talking – I’ll say a word if you give me another one of those yummy cheerios. I can see it now.

I was totally that kid in high school who raced home every day to play games. If my screen time was limited, I was on to board games. I could get lost for hours in fantasy worlds and created my own fantasy-based board game before I was nine. By the time I was 15, I was programming and coding and had a few small apps that got a little attention. Even if I wasn’t the next prodigy, it was pretty clear where my path was heading.

This passion carried me through my education at Full Sail University, where I got a degree in (you guessed it) Game Development. I also picked up most of the classes for a Game Design degree and am slowly working on completing this certification while I’m working.

Today, I work for a small game company out of Tampa Bay, Florida. I’m currently programming code for a couple of their top games and some upcoming titles. In the meantime, I’m working on my own title and learning all I can so one day I can be a game designer. I know I’ll get there eventually because it’s what I was born to do.

  • Why It’s Great:

    • Marvin’s passion for his field is evident in everything that he says.

    • He keeps a humorous tone throughout that’s filled with personality.

    • His drive and willingness to do what he needs to succeed points to him achieving his goals.

How To Create Your Own Great LinkedIn Profile

You’re motivated, you’re inspired – maybe you even have a few ideas already percolating. So how do you pull it all together and create a LinkedIn profile that makes people feel like they know you and want to interact with you?

LinkedIn profiles tend to cover certain areas of a person’s life and career. If your LinkedIn profile reads like a professional objective on a resume, you need to breathe more life into it and round it out a bit. The following are some of the categories that you can hit upon in your profile synopsis.

  • Your passions. What makes you tick, wake up in the morning, keeps your brain on fire with ideas? These are the things you want to share and let the world know about.

  • Your job. This is one of the obvious ones, but instead of just stating your job title, explain what you actually do in very simple terms. Make it so your grandmother can understand, even if she can’t figure out how to use a smartphone.

  • Your education/experience. These things are almost a given in LinkedIn but should at least be touched upon. Try to make your education and your employment history as interesting and as connected to your current position as possible.

  • Highlight your wins. Brag a little – it’s okay. Heck, this is your stage. You’re creating it for yourself, and that means you get to be the star. Just try to celebrate your accomplishments in a humble way.

  • Your personal life. It’s okay to mention your personal life on your LinkedIn profile. So many people are afraid to say personal things because they know an employer can’t legally ask them in a job interview. But those laws don’t apply here. You can give up whatever personal information you want, or you can share none of it if you want – it’s your choice.

  • Media, and more. Maybe a picture, a video, or other media is better at depicting you and your work. Feel free to get creative. A picture is worth a thousand words, after all.

Tips for Writing a LinkedIn Profile

Now that you know what you can discuss in your LinkedIn profile, these tips will help you figure out how to say it.

  • First impressions count. Just like an interview, your first impression counts. Make that first sentence or paragraph come alive for the reader.

  • Use good grammar. If you’re not good at spelling or grammar, then have someone who is proofread it for you. Do you want the fact that you can never figure out the difference between then and than to be your professional downfall? Or how about the fact that you misuse the word utilize all the time? These grammatical pet peeves don’t belong in your profile.

  • Write like you speak. For some, this might be a bit of a contradiction from what we just said. But what we really mean is that your tone should be conversational. Don’t make your LinkedIn bio too professional or stuffy. Go for something more fun and lighthearted instead. But still, use correct spelling and grammar.

  • Anecdotes. Telling a story or sharing something about your childhood or your personal life makes you more relatable. Even if you just fell into your career by accident, there might be a great story there that captures the reader’s interest.

  • What do you want? Why are you on LinkedIn? If it’s to connect with other professionals, ask them to connect in your profile. If it’s to find a new job or some freelance clients, you need to let people know that you’re available. Asking for what you want or telling people is a big part of being a LinkedIn success.

  • Be willing to rewrite. You never know when inspiration will hit. Be ready for that bolt of inspiration when it comes, and then hop on and rewrite your profile. Once it’s written, it’s not set in stone. Change your summary as often as you need to until you find the perfect one for you and watch your connections start adding up.

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Chris Kolmar

Author

Chris Kolmar

Chris Kolmar is a co-founder of Zippia and the editor-in-chief of the Zippia career advice blog. He has hired over 50 people in his career, been hired five times, and wants to help you land your next job. His research has been featured on the New York Times, Thrillist, VOX, The Atlantic, and a host of local news. More recently, he's been quoted on USA Today, BusinessInsider, and CNBC.

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