How College Students Can Successfully Navigate The Job Market During The Coronavirus

Copied!

Thousands of Colleges and Universities across the country have closed their campuses for the rest of the semester. To make things easier for college and university students during this transition, we created a guide to help students navigate through this pandemic. This guide will help you find remote and in-person job opportunities, nail your remote interviews, work productively from home, and much more.

Should college seniors bother applying for jobs?

Reading encourages creative thinking and helps your child’s mind and body slow down a little bit and focus on one thing. It is also one of the best, free sources of entertainment you can get. Writing is also a great skill to develop. It helps children communicate, and along with reading, is the basis of a large portion of the work your child will complete throughout their educational journey.

  • People Are Still Hiring: While some companies may be putting a temporary pause on hiring, others are continuing to operate and hire remotely. This year’s graduates should expect a job hunt that relies on technology more than ever and will need to prepare themselves for remote interviews.

  • Be Prepared To Wait: In addition, seniors should anticipate a longer hiring process than graduates in recent years, as companies develop procedures for interviewing applicants remotely.

  • Apply Now: A longer hiring process makes applying for jobs sooner rather than later, all the more important.

  • Stay Hopeful: Even if the economy slows down, there will still be jobs available. College seniors who are actively applying for many jobs will have the best shot at snagging a job.

How Will The Coronavirus Impact The LSATs, MCAT, And GRE?

The LSATs, MCAT, and GRE have all experienced schedule changes that will impact test takers. We broke these down for you. Currently, uncertainty surrounds many professional tests you may be relying on for your continued education future and career path. While so much remains out of your control, we encourage you to use this time productively and work on what is in your control– acing the test and getting your best score. Take comfort that this situation is not unique to you. Law schools, medical schools, and graduate programs understand students are facing unexpected obstacles and may be taking tests in less than ideal situations or late. Many institutions will no doubt deal with impacted students with compassion and exercise flexibility with deadlines. We urge you to follow the institutions you plan on applying to see there evolving policies.

How has the Coronavirus impacted the LSAT?

  • March Test: The March LSAT was cancelled and all March test takers were automatically rescheduled for the April 25th test. However, if you are unable to take the exam on that date or at the registered location, you can fill out the online schedule change form. All change fees have been waived, in light of the circumstances.

  • April Test: If the pandemic continues into April, the next test date may be postponed as well. Currently, the LSAT test has not been modified and is still in person. However, LSAC is closely monitoring the situation and may add remote options.

  • What You Can Do: While it is undoubtedly frustrating to have so much out of your control, we recommend you use this time to focus on what you can control- acing the LSAT. Law schools are aware of the situation and are likely to exercise compassion to impacted students. In the meantime, other than hitting the books, you can monitor the situation on the LSAC website and reach out to your law schools of choice to see their policies as they evolve.

How has the coronavirus impacted the MCAT?

  • March & April Test: The March 2th and April 4th MCAT exams have been cancelled. AAMC is allowing flexible rescheduling for all exams until the end of May, all fees waived, for those who have been displaced or are unable to take the exam as planned. No additional MCAT tests have been scheduled as of yet. However, AAMC is monitoring the situation and will add test dates as the situation unfolds.

  • Online Test Prep: Online test prep materials purchased through AAMC will have expiration dates adjusted, to allow students full access until their new test date.

  • Updates:The AAMC continues to monitor the situation and you can see the latest updates here.

How has the coronavirus impacted the GRE?

  • GRE Tests ETS has launched a remote test for GRE students who have been affected by the coronavirus. While the content of the test, format, and grading remains identical, students can take the test safely at home, while being monitored by a live remote proctor.

  • Home Test Dates: Home test dates start on Friday, March 27th. ETS is waiving all rescheduling fees for impacted students until April 4th. However, if you are not comfortable with an online test, you can reschedule your exam for further out. Be mindful about your graduate school admittance dates and requirements. Graduate programs may be less flexible with a remote alternative in place. Unfortunately, all April 4th GRE subject tests have been cancelled and cannot be taken with online. New test dates will be published in April 2020.

  • Updates:You can continue to monitor the GRE situation here and answer any additional questions you may have.

Personal Stories

Perspectives and advice from college seniors

Molly Dawson is senior at Rollins College. She is an environmental studies major with a concentration in biology.

Perspectives and advice from a college senior


What jobs did you have while you were in school? What happened to them?

I have two jobs. I work at my school’s admissions office and Universal Studios. I’m still working in the office, but they are currently trying to figure out a way that student employees can work from home while still getting paid. My supervisors within the admissions office have done a really great job fighting for other student employees and me so that we were not out of a job. Universal Studios is asking us not to come into work. Fortunately, they are still paying us for all of our shifts that we have scheduled thus far. It looks like they are going to try and pay us according to our average hours per week, which has been great.


Has COVID-19 affected your job search for after you graduate?

I have been applying to jobs. But, with everything that’s going on, it definitely hasn’t been the top of my priority list. My school switched to online classes right before our spring break, classes are now starting back up, and I am going back to work.


How have things changed at your school?

My university is still technically open and has not said that our campus is closed. International students and those who couldn’t go home were able to stay on campus. Those students are living in our on-site apartments and are social distancing over there. Students are hoping to receive the option to take their classes either for a grade or pass/fail. Moving off campus and switching over to remote learning has been a significant hindrance and burden on students, and the ability to take classes pass/fail would take some stress away.


Do you have any advice for other students that are being affected by COVID-19?

I am a very schedule-oriented person. Not having the typical structure I had while in school has been really difficult to adjust to. To help me stay organized, I have made myself a schedule. I’m trying to divvy up my time and follow the schedule I make so that I can be productive and get stuff done. Knowing that I’m getting things done also helps with my mental health. Continue to connect with your friends and remember that they are all still there. You might not be able to see them, but you can always contact them. Talking with them has been helping me as well.


Are there any silver linings to this devastating pandemic?

There are a decent amount of positives. As a college student, there have been so many times I said I’d do something if I only had time, so it is a blessing in that sense. Now I finally have some time. Taking classes from home is less of a time commitment, so I can do things that I’ve been putting off for a while. I also now have time to see my family. Since my family lives two hours from my university, it allowed me to spend a couple of days there and help out on their farm. I encourage everyone to take the time to reinforce your relationships with the people you live with, whoever that may be.


It’s important to recognize that not everyone has been able to go home and spend time with their family. Also, being laid off from work has caused so much stress that not everyone can sit at home and watch TV all day. For those that are fortunate enough that that’s their new reality, to hang out at home, take the time to appreciate your situation.

Ajay Dayal is a senior at the University of Florida’s Warrington College of Business, pursing a Master of Science in Finance.

Perspectives and advice from a college senior


What jobs did you have while you were in school? What happened to them?

I worked part-time as an extension of the business career services offices. We have a program that allows current students to take the load off of career advisors and assist other students looking for internships and jobs. My job was already variable in the sense that it depended on when students would come to see you or when they would ask for appointments. We would have weekly walk-in hours, which was a guarantee that you would get paid. To compensate for everything moving online, we have opened ourselves up for virtual appointments and for virtual office hours, where we’ll do Zoom conferences. We send out an email to the student body with links to join if they choose to. It’s already challenging to get people to come in for career advising because they are intimidated by the process. It’s even harder when students have to make the effort to schedule a meeting instead of being able to walk by an office or a table.


Has COVID-19 affected your job search for after you graduate?

A lot of people are worried that companies will rescind their internship and job offers. I know a couple of companies that have already rescinded internship offers, but most of them haven’t yet. The job that I’m signed onto full time after graduation sent out an email earlier this week, basically saying they don’t know what will happen, so stay tuned. I guess that is what every company is dealing with.


Do you have any advice for other students that are being affected by COVID-19?

This is a difficult situation to predict, so I wouldn’t try to spend time thinking about whether or not you are going to have a job in a few months. Instead, spend your time trying to build skills that you wanted to build before. You can get certifications on different technical skills that you wouldn’t have had time to get otherwise. Doing this will make you a more competitive applicant if you need to start looking for new work. If your job offer is from a smaller company that might not have the resources to get through this prolonged period without downsizing, I advise them to see what other job postings are out there. If you’re hearing about people starting to get offers rescinded, don’t panic. Reach out to your connections to see if there are any other opportunities out there and try to build skills that will make you more competitive if you need to be.


Are there any silver linings to this devastating pandemic?

I’m in Gainesville and they’ve just issued a stay at home order. So, there’s not a whole lot you can do. When else are you going to have the time to not worry about going to class and other commitments that you have? At college, there is this constant rat race between classes, extracurriculars, and job hunting. This situation is a forced slow where you can take a minute to enjoy time off and do things like spending time with your family or significant other if your living with them. I just bought a book which I haven’t done in I don’t know how many years because I actually have the time to. The situation is not ideal, but you can find things to do to keep yourself occupied that you wouldn’t be able to do if you were rushed to the end of the school year.

Luke Green is a senior at Wesleyan University studying history and environmental studies.

Perspectives and advice from a college senior


What jobs did you have while you were in school? What happened to them?

I had two jobs at Wesleyan before it closed. I was an assistant in the inter loan office of my school’s library and worked for the office of community service as a van driver. I worked around 15 hours a week. Both jobs are now gone because they required me to be physically present at the university. Those two sources of funding were part of my work-study allotment as part of my financial aid package. Thankfully, Wesleyan is doing a great job of dealing with the school’s closure and is going to pay all work-study students fully.


Has COVID-19 affected your job search for after you graduate?

The virus is making my job search much more challenging. Just today, I got an email from one of the companies that I applied to saying that they are halting all hiring for the long-term future. I haven’t had a lot of time since being asked to move out and coming home to sit down and apply for more jobs. For the moment, it seems that most opportunities for the next few months are being postponed. I’m going to keep throwing applications in because it can’t hurt. Even if people aren’t hiring, I can still write a message asking them to consider my resume for future searches once things start getting better.


Part-time work is different. I live in a small rural town in Massachusetts. There are a lot of signs in supermarkets saying that they are hiring because either people can’t come into work or they are so crowded that they need other people to work. However, my parents don’t want me to work because of the risk those jobs entail. It’s a catch 22 because you need to work and make more money, but you can’t physically go anywhere.


Do you have any advice for other students that are being affected by COVID-19?

To anyone who is not a senior, take advantage of every day that you are at college because you do not know when it can end. Take advantage of the resources, relationships, and connections school offers. Networking is really important and will help you in the future.


For the seniors, as terrible as this is, try to find one positive thing a day or different moments to keep you going. Keep yourself busy with different projects. They don’t necessarily have to be related to academics. Also, keep reaching out to friends.


Are there any silver linings to this devastating pandemic?

It gives everyone more time to think, which can be scary but also good. I feel like our world is so fast and go, but now to actually be bored and deal with that, it can be a valuable opportunity if you make it one. Learn something new, try something new, pick up a new hobby, practice a new skill, write a book. There are a lot of valuable opportunities that come from being forced to be at home that we don’t usually get unless we are on vacation.

Shoshana Levenson is a senior at Lesley University studying holistic psychology and expressive art therapy.

Perspectives and advice from a college senior


What jobs did you have while you were in school? What happened to them?

Before my campus closed, I was working at my school’s library. Thankfully, I get to continue to work from home. The library is putting together projects for us to do remotely, which is really helpful. The downside is that since the library is closed, I don’t get as many hours. I live off-campus, so not having as much work available makes it harder to pay for things like rent. I still recognize that I am lucky to have the opportunity to work from home right now since I know a lot of people are in positions where they don’t get to. I am currently looking for a side job and trying to think of different ways to make money from home. Online tutoring seems like a good option. It’s challenging to find something since people aren’t hiring because of everything that’s going on.


Has COVID-19 affected your job search for after you graduate?

As for finding a job after graduation, I am lucky enough to have an internship that I have had throughout the school year. I am hoping to get a job offer from them. For many students, coronavirus disrupts the process of transitioning from college to out of college. For example, there was supposed to be a job fair at my school that is no longer happening because the campus closed.


How have things changed at your school?

Everything is now being conducted remotely. My school is tiny, so I’m used to a lot of one on one time with my professors. We are all still trying to figure out how to communicate via voice conferencing and email instead of getting to sit down with each other. I also have a lot of experiential and hands-on classes that are challenging to do remotely. We’re not really sure how it’s going to go yet. But we’re doing the best we can, and everyone is adjusting. So far, it’s definitely been a challenge but not impossible.


Do you have any advice for other students that are being affected by COVID-19?

Find a creative outlet. Find things that you can do to help you relax and de-stress. I’ve been doing a lot of art. I found a bunch of art supplies that I had in my house and am making collages from old magazines. I have also been journaling. Being away from school is also a great opportunity to take a step back from everything that has been stressing you out and appreciate that you can put things on pause for a minute. Yes, the situation is awful and stressful, but I now have a chance to relax and distribute my energy in different ways than I did while on campus. I can also step back and reflect on all of the things I did in the last four years.


How do you stay motivated and get your work done at home?

It’s important to have a designated space where they can work. I’ve been setting up in my kitchen where I can sit and have my stuff together. It is tough to motivate, especially when you don’t have to get up for class. Being able to take classes from bed definitely makes it harder to focus. I keep a really detailed agenda with classwork and homework to try to keep me focused. It’s a new system for everyone, and I’m not sure how it’s going to work yet, but I hope it goes well.

Sarah Boyd is a senior at Penn State University, majoring in veterinarian biomedical.

Perspectives and advice from a college senior


Has COVID-19 affected your job search for after you graduate?

I have a job lined up at a vet clinic, which is considered essential personal. I also have an internship that I was supposed to be going to from mid-May to mid-June in South Africa, but was canceled. If things clear up by the end of the summer, we can reschedule and maybe do it then. But that was a big blow because I wasn’t going to start work until the end of June or early July. So now I have to find out if I can start earlier.


How have things changed at your school?

My campus closed down and we are now taking classes remotely. It’s been pretty challenging to transition from in-person classes to remote. People are still getting the hang of everything and trying to figure it out. I have a hard time taking notes while trying to follow an online lecture. I get distracted, and sometimes there are technical errors like vocals not matching up with the slides we are on. Our second round of exams are coming up, so teachers are trying to figure out how to schedule exams while preserving academic integrity. A lot of them have given us time limits on exams and made them open notes. Some professors are making things a little more difficult and setting time limits per question. Also, a lot of universities are helping students transition by offering pass-fail grading options instead of letter grades. However, for people planning on applying to graduate schools, some schools don’t accept pass-fail grades for prerequisites.


As a second semester senior, I was pretty devastated when I found out we were transitioning remotely for the rest of the semester. A lot of seniors are pretty bummed out and upset about everything. Our graduation was canceled along with our end of the year college experiences which we planned out already.


Do you have any advice for other students that are being affected by COVID-19?

Do not take this as an early summer vacation. Try to maintain the same kind of routine that you had at school and make sure you are keeping up with your assignments. As a senior, it’s a little more challenging because we already had senioritis.


Recognize that you don’t have to say goodbye to your friends completely. You can still communicate with them. My friends and I made a virtual TikToc together the other day. So, hang in there. For non-seniors, you will come back to the same university, and it’s going to be just as amazing as when you left


Are there any silver linings to this devastating pandemic?

This pandemic is bringing into light the importance of washing your hands, getting vaccines, and doing other basics that a lot of people take for granted. Also, it encourages people to be kind to others. Try to keep everyone in mind. My two neighbors are in their 80s, and when I went grocery shopping, I called and asked if they needed anything from the store, so they wouldn’t have to go out.


Also, carbon emissions in the countries that have been quarantined have decreased incredibly. So, COVID-19 is helping our environment, which is an interesting perspective to take everything in.

Taking Care Of Your Mental Health

People across the country are feeling fear and anxiety about the spread of COVID-19. Students also have to deal with leaving their institutions, transitioning to a work from home environment, and losing jobs. It is incredibly important to take some time to take care of yourself during this stressful time. Here are several mental health apps that will help.

Aloe Bud: Aloe Bud is a free self-care pocket companion that encourages its users to practice self-care activities. Aloe Bud helps individuals hydrate, move, breathe, and stay motivated, refreshed, and stimulated throughout the day. One user wrote, “I’m someone who really struggles with self-care and keeping track of the things that I do, and this helps so much. You can write things down on the go when you don’t have your journal and look back at them later if you need to. 10/10 would aloe bud again.”


Joyable: Joyable is the perfect place to get support for your entire team. Joyable connects people with a dedicated coach and a two-month course based on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). With Joyable you can access proven help, anytime, anywhere. With Joyable you will have happier employees and lower turnover rates. One member wrote, “I’m not afraid to talk to my bosses and I’m not afraid to talk to strangers. I’ve got confidence back again. It’s completely changed me.”

Headspace: This award-winning research-backed app has hundreds of guided meditations and mindfulness techniques to help with stress, focus, anxiety, and sleep. Studies found that 30 days of Headspace lowers stress by 32%, and four sessions reduce burnout by 14% and increase focus by 14%. Join companies like LinkedIn and Adobe and start using this app.

Insight Timer: Insight Timer is a meditation app with 30,000 free meditations and music tracks. It was voted App of the Year by TIME magazine and Women’s Health. Insight Timer has guided meditations and talks led by the world’s greatest meditation and mindfulness experts, neuroscientists, psychologists, and professors from top universities. Whether you are a beginner or experienced practitioner, this app caters to everyone.

Stop, Breathe, & Think: Stop, Breathe, & Think is an emotional wellness platform designed for the “under 25.”They encourage its users to stop what they are doing, practice mindful breathing, and to broaden their perspective. Users take a survey that evaluates their mood and then choose a guided meditation based on the results.

Youper: Youper uses artificial intelligence to personalize different techniques to fit its users’ needs and helps them calm their minds, sleep better, and become more productive and happier. It also uses conversations based on therapy techniques and mindfulness to help people monitor and improve their emotional health. 80% of the users experience a reduction in negative moods after just one conversion.

How Can You Make Money During The Coronavirus

Many college and university students lost their jobs when their campuses closed. Higher education is expensive, and without these additional sources of income, it can be challenging to pay for tuition. While you are waiting to hear back from employers, here are several tips to help you save money quickly.

Start saving

If you are currently employed, start saving as much money as you can. Unfortunately, more and more people are being laid off daily, and there is no way to be sure that your job is safe. Even the smallest amount of emergency savings can make a huge difference.

Cut back on unneeded expenses

Take some time to look over your expenses. Is there anything you can eliminate? The closure of most non-essential public facilities will help reduce some of your routine expenses naturally. Being confined to your home will also help you save on transportation. Another way to save on costs is to move in with friends or family if possible.

Start identifying additional sources of income

Start devising a backup plan. It’s never a bad idea to have some work from home opportunities lined up just in case. Since many are staying home, it’s not a bad idea to find a stable way to earn income online. Online tutoring is a great way that college students can make money online.

MAJOR PLATFORMS TO FIND QUICK WORK ONLINE

Upwork

Upwork is a global, online freelancing platform. People can shop for any number of services, from commissioning news articles and research, to having a company logo designed or helping with accounting work. Upwork is a great way to put a hobby or unused skill to work for a little extra cash.

Upwork is a global, online freelancing platform. People can shop for any number of services, from commissioning news articles and research, to having a company logo designed or helping with accounting work. Upwork is a great way to put a hobby or unused skill to work for a little extra cash.

You can expect to make $8-10 per hour for basic data entry while more skillful jobs will net you over $50 per hour. Expect to come in on the lower side for your first projects.
Fiverr

Fiverr is a digital market place where people can find, compare and buy any number of services they may need. You can find someone for pretty much anything on Fiverr.

Fiverr is a digital market place where people can find, compare and buy any number of services they may need. You can find someone for pretty much anything on Fiverr.

People on Fiverr make from $10 per hour to $50-$55 per hour depending on skill set and jobs.
Chegg

Chegg is an online tutoring platform. It offers people a great way to apply their skills and knowledge to help out students in need and get paid in the process. It allows you to work from anywhere with internet access with students all across the world.

Chegg is an online tutoring platform. It offers people a great way to apply their skills and knowledge to help out students in need and get paid in the process. It allows you to work from anywhere with internet access with students all across the world.

Chegg tutors make $20 per hour and can earn upwards of $1,200 a month.
Rev

Rev provides transcription, captioning, and foreign subtitling as a service to businesses. It uses a network of freelancers to power the transciptions.

Rev provides transcription, captioning, and foreign subtitling as a service to businesses. It uses a network of freelancers to power the transciptions.

Get paid $0.30-1.10 per minute for transcription audio and $0.54-1.10 for video captioning. Most people make about $10-15/day.
VipKid

VIPKid is an online teaching and education company. Teachers must have college degrees as well as some form of teaching certification to work through VIPKid. Users must also be completely fluent in English themselves and ideally have a neutral American accent. Previous experience working with children is not required but strongly recommended. Teachers must also have reliable internet, video streaming capabilities, and headphones/microphones that work very well. Props are highly recommended for engaging students.

VIPKid is an online teaching and education company. Teachers must have college degrees as well as some form of teaching certification to work through VIPKid. Users must also be completely fluent in English themselves and ideally have a neutral American accent. Previous experience working with children is not required but strongly recommended. Teachers must also have reliable internet, video streaming capabilities, and headphones/microphones that work very well. Props are highly recommended for engaging students.

Teachers can make up to $22 per hour, with a base rate being around $14-18 per hour. VIPKid also offers teachers bonuses for going above and beyond.
UserTesting

It’s as straightforward as that, you will be given an assignment to visit a website and complete a task. You need to vocalize why you are taking actions, what you think will happen when you take an action, and your overall impression of using the site.

It’s as straightforward as that, you will be given an assignment to visit a website and complete a task. You need to vocalize why you are taking actions, what you think will happen when you take an action, and your overall impression of using the site.

Testers make about $10-50 a day on UserTesting.com.
eBay

eBay is an online market place where people can buy, sell and trade goods every day. You can sell pretty much anything on the site, and even set up bidding wars between users from all around the world for whatever you happen to be selling. eBay can be a great way to make a little extra cash on the side while looking for work and can serve as a great way to part with some of those things around the house that aren’t necessities. The eBay website is a great way to start a little side business, maybe selling clothes that don’t fit anymore, old collections that you have no need for or anything in between.

eBay is an online market place where people can buy, sell and trade goods every day. You can sell pretty much anything on the site, and even set up bidding wars between users from all around the world for whatever you happen to be selling. eBay can be a great way to make a little extra cash on the side while looking for work and can serve as a great way to part with some of those things around the house that aren’t necessities. The eBay website is a great way to start a little side business, maybe selling clothes that don’t fit anymore, old collections that you have no need for or anything in between.

Expect to make approximately $100-500 after about a month. You’ll be limited to what you can sell around the house.
Clickworker

Clickworker is an alternative to Mturk. You are tasked with doing simple online activities, normally around data or surveys. For example, you might need to go to a website and verify some information or fill out a quick survey.

Clickworker is an alternative to Mturk. You are tasked with doing simple online activities, normally around data or surveys. For example, you might need to go to a website and verify some information or fill out a quick survey.

Starting out, expect to make $2-3 per hour as you get used to it and figuring out what jobs to work on. Over time, that will get up to $4-7 per hour and higher if you work fewer hours on higher paying jobs.
InboxDollars

InboxDollars is an easy and free way to earn some extra money for things you do online anyway. You make money by doing things like sharing your opinions in surveys, filling out polls, watching videos and offering reactions, conducting web searches, online shopping, and more. With an intuitive platform, you can earn from your computer or on the go with your smartphone, making it a great way to kill a little time and actually getting paid for it.

InboxDollars is an easy and free way to earn some extra money for things you do online anyway. You make money by doing things like sharing your opinions in surveys, filling out polls, watching videos and offering reactions, conducting web searches, online shopping, and more. With an intuitive platform, you can earn from your computer or on the go with your smartphone, making it a great way to kill a little time and actually getting paid for it.

People can make anywhere between $15 and $55 a month.
italki

Online educational platform italki is one of the only language-specific online learning tools in the market. Students can sign up, handpick their own teachers and pay by the lesson. They are selective with who they hire to ensure that all teachers are able to get work, and it is not uncommon to see applications for popular languages closed to prospective teachers. You can sign up to be either a Professional Teacher or a Community Tutor. Professional Teachers can earn much more money but have much stricter requirements to get approved. Community Tutors make less money, but just about anyone over the age of 18 that is a fluent speaker of the language they are teaching can do it.

Online educational platform italki is one of the only language-specific online learning tools in the market. Students can sign up, handpick their own teachers and pay by the lesson. They are selective with who they hire to ensure that all teachers are able to get work, and it is not uncommon to see applications for popular languages closed to prospective teachers. You can sign up to be either a Professional Teacher or a Community Tutor. Professional Teachers can earn much more money but have much stricter requirements to get approved. Community Tutors make less money, but just about anyone over the age of 18 that is a fluent speaker of the language they are teaching can do it.

Italki teachers can make anywhere from $5-$25 per hour.


Online Jobs You Can Do With Limited Experience

Data Entry Associate

Data entry is a job that can be done entirely online. The primary job of a data entry consultant is to input information into a database or other platform. The average annual salary for data entry is $33,000.

Medical Billers and Coder

Medical billers and coders manage confidential health information and help connect health care providers, insurance companies, and patients. While many medical billing jobs require some type of certification or experience, there is entry level work available. The average medical biller coder salary is $33,000/yr. Similar positions include medical coding technician and healthcare information coder.

Customer Service Agent

Customer service agents or customer service representatives handle customer complaints, process orders, and answer customer questions. Customer service agents can work over the phone, through chat boxes, or via email. A large portion of customer requests come through email platforms, and because they can be accessed from anywhere with the internet, remote agents are ideal candidates for handling those requests. This job only requires a high school diploma and offers on the job training. The average salary of $30,000 a year.

Telemarketer

Telemarketers, also known as online sales representatives, make or receive inbound calls, to build customer relationships and sell goods or services. Telemarketers spend the vast majority of their day on the phone. This job is ideal for those who enjoy dealing with people and can handle calls that may turn unpleasant. Telemarketers can expect to earn $30,000 a year.

Virtual Assistant

Virtual assistants perform routine secretarial duties that include organizing files, scheduling events, and support activities. Being familiar with computer programs will help you land a job as a virtual office assistant. The annual salary is $27,000.

Order Specialist

An order specialist insures that customers receive their goods in a timely manner. Order specialists are in a customer facing role, interacting with customers via email and over the phone. While the average pay is $52,000 a year, entry level workers can expect to earn less.

Online Tutor

Online tutoring is a great way to work remotely. You can offer to tutor others in a subject that aligns with your major. This will give you a leg up on the competition and show that you are qualified. Online tutors can expect to get paid anywhere from $10-$30/hr, depending on experience.

COMMON QUESTIONS: CORONAVIRUS

Are there income options for people who cannot work because they’re sick with coronavirus?

The government is working hard to come up with a quick, easy solution to this. But at the moment nothing has really been passed. The House passed an emergency relief package last weekend that is still pending Senate approval. The H.R. 6201: Families First CoronaVirus Response Ac would support workers with 2 paid weeks of sick leave plus up to 3 months of paid family and medical leave. The act would also expand access to free COVID-19 testing and provide $1 billion in food aid for children. Additionally, the Treasury Department has called for a $250 billion proposal of sending direct payments on April 6 and May 18 to every American citizen.

Can wearing a face mask at work stop me from contracting coronavirus?”

While a face mask may stop you from breathing in viral particles if people cough and sneeze around you, the most common way people contract coronavirus is by touching things that have viral particles on them and then touching their eyes, nose, or mouth.

How can I stay safe at my job?”

One important thing that you can do is to practice social distancing. Keep a distance of at least six feet from others whenever possible. If this is not possible at your place of work, there are several other precautions you can take. Do not touch your face, wash your hands often with warm water and soap for 20 second, and use alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. You can also clean and disinfect objects and surfaces in your workspace that are touched by many. Finally, stay at home if you are sick and encourage others to do the same.

Experts are saying to avoid public transportation. What if I cannot get to work without using it?”

Thankfully, the largest U.S. public transit systems are increasing the amount they clean and enhancing sanitary measures. You can ask your employer if you can work during non-peak hours, if possible. Public transportation will be less crowded during these times. If you can, stay six feet away from others while in transit. Doing so can be challenging, but if you are on a subway and there are only three other people in your cart, sit as far away from them as possible. Another thing you can do is to touch as little as possible and avoid touching your face until you wash your hands and disinfect your phone screen. You can also try to take forms of public transit that have better ventilation. For example, you can open windows on some busses. Unfortunately, if you are sick or fit into one of the at-risk categories, it is probably smarter to avoid public transit and other crowded spaces as well.

Am I at risk if I receive packages or products?”

There is a lot of unknown when it comes to how COVID-19 spreads. Coronavirus does not survive well on surfaces, so there is likely a low risk of spread from products or packaging shipped over days or weeks at ambient temperatures, according to the CDC. Currently, no evidence exists that supports the transmission of coronavirus associated with imported goods.

Can I have a babysitter or childcare provider in my house if I need someone to watch my kids while I go to work?”

While in an ideal scenario, you would limit your child’s exposure to others, that is not always possible. You can minimize risk by choosing a babysitter who has limited contact with others besides your family. So, you may not want to hire someone who has a second job at a grocery store or in healthcare. While it might be difficult, ask your babysitter to limit their physical interactions with your children and to keep a physical distance of six feet if possible. For example, they can throw or roll a ball back and forth. Also, make sure that your children and babysitter wash their hands often. You can even have your babysitter model and teach your kids good hygiene, i.e., handwashing, hand sanitizing, and not touching their face if they are old enough to understand it. Finally, communicate with your babysitter that if they feel sick or have been exposed to COVID-19 to not come to your house.

If I have coronavirus is my employer allowed to tell the other people that I work with?”

Your employer cannot tell other employees that you have coronavirus. Employers are required to keep your medical information confidential. They can make other employees and customers or vendors that you may have been in contact with aware that someone at the company tested positive for coronavirus.

Can my employer take my temperature before work?”

Under normal circumstances, they cannot take your temperature. However, if the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) or a state or local authority declares a pandemic has spread in your area, they can.

If I show symptoms relating to coronavirus, can my employer send me home?”

Yes, your employer can send you home. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that employers should send home employees who fall ill with coronavirus symptoms so that they are no longer in contact with other employees. Symptoms include fever, cough, and shortness of breath.

My employer is treating me differently than other coworkers because I am Asian or from another country because of coronavirus. What can I do?

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, and national origin. If you believe you have been discriminated against by an employer when applying for a job or while on the job because of these things, you can file a charge of discrimination with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). You can call them toll-free at 800-669-4000 or 800-669-6820 (TDD).


HOW TO BE PRODUCTIVE WORKING FROM HOME?

With the advent of coronavirus, thousands of college and university students are working from home. Many individuals struggle to focus outside of their standard work setting. Here are a few tips to help you stay productive while working from home.

  • Designate a Place to Work: : Designate a specific place in your home to do work. Working at a desk or table is usually best. The most important place to avoid working is your bed. Your brain should know that your bead is for two things, sleep and intimacy. If you start working while in bed, how is your brain supposed to know when you lay down at night if it is for the purpose of getting a solid eight hours or to make a conference call.

  • Establish a Routine: Establishing a work routine is crucial not only for your work productivity but also for your mental health. Create a morning routine for yourself to create a transition into your workday. Consider waking at least ten minutes before you start working to prepare mentally and physically for your day. Get dressed, take a shower, eat breakfast, and give yourself a lunch break. Also, assign yourself an end time. While you cannot leave your office, you need to have boundaries when you can and cannot work. Sign off, turn your computer off, and recognize your workday is over.

  • Exercise: Sitting is the new smoking. Countless studies show that periodically walking and taking breaks from sitting at your desk can improve your physical health and improve concentration.

  • Have Ground rules with your housemates:Make sure that the people living with you know when you are working. If they can come up to you at any time, you will never get anything done. Just because you are home, do not let other people think that you can drop what you’re doing at any time to do things around the house.

  • Know Your Weaknesses: Recognize your strengths and weaknesses and how they will play into your work from home life. If you are an over worker, set alarms to make sure you take breaks. If you are on the overly relaxed side, set a strict schedule for yourself. Wake up early, shower, get dressed, and start working. Know what distracts you. If you are a T.V. person, don’t have your favorite show on in the background while you work. On the other hand, for those who hate the quiet, consider putting on some music in the background.

  • Maintain regular hours: There are tracking apps like Wunderlist and Trello that help you stick to your schedule. Recognize when you are the most productive so that you can schedule your high priority tasks for those times.

  • Sleep: Establish a solid sleep routine. Though working from home may seem like an excellent vacation from waking up early from work, setting a consistent wakeup time is the most beneficial thing you can do to maintain your sleep hygiene.

  • Snack: Unless you want to put on the freshman 15 while on quarantine, set regular meal and snack times. When you are at home, the temptation to consistently snack is tough to ignore when you have a pantry filled with your favorite snacks just a few steps away.

  • Socialize: It is easy to become lonely or feel isolated when you are working from home by yourself for extended periods. Continue to communicate with other colleagues and your friends. You can have a virtual lunch with someone or schedule a virtual happy hour with someone. Use your webcam and make sure that you do not just hear each other but see each other as well.

  • Take Breaks: Consider taking breaks from your computer for brief amounts of time. It is not healthy to sit in the same place for eight hours a day. Try to either leave your home or leave the room you are working in and leave your computer behind! Your eyes need some rest.`

HOW TO NAIL YOUR REMOTE INTERVIEW

Coronavirus is sparking a wave of remote hiring. Remote interviewing is a different dynamic than in-person interviewing and thus requires unique preparation. Here are a few ways to help you nail your remote interview.

  1. Create A Distraction-free environment: You want to conduct your interview in a quiet room where you can focus.

    • Distractions: Eliminate external noises like radios or television. Also, make sure that your phone is set to silent if you are conducting a video interview and that you turn all of your notifications off.

    • Children: If you have children or sibilings, make sure that someone is looking after them. If they are old enough, explain to them that they have to be quiet and cannot bother you unless it is an emergency for the duration of the interview.

    • Pets: If you have a pet, try to keep them distracted during your interview. An excellent way to do this is to give them a treat before your meeting starts. For dogs, try to eliminate their barking.

  2. Interview Backdrop: For video interviews, creating a professional backdrop is very important.

    • Clean:Make sure that the room you are in is clean. There should be no stacks of loose paper, dirty dishes, laundry, garbage on the floor, or unmade beds in the background. You should also eliminate clutter in the room.

    • Decorations: The decorations in the room should be appropriate. For example, make sure your wall art does not have any curses in it and that the images are fitting for an interview.

    • Lighting: The room you choose to conduct your interview in should be well lit so that the interviewer does not have trouble seeing you. If your interview is by a window, make sure that you are not backlit or that the light is too bright, creating a glare.

  3. Test Your Tech: Make sure that everything is working ahead of time.

    • Camera: Test the camera that you are going to use ahead of time. You do not want to discover at the beginning of your interview that it is broken.

    • Microphone: Make sure your audio works and that the sound quality is good. The interviewer may get frustrated if it is hard to hear you.

    • Internet and ServiceFor video interviews, double-check to see if you have reliable internet. For phone interviews, make sure that there is adequate service in the room where you are going to have your interview.

    • Video Software: Test the software you are using ahead of time. Many recruiters use Skype or Zoom, which allows you to test the platform, camera, and microphone ahead of time.

  4. Interview Attire: Dressing to impress is not just important for in-person interviews. Even if it is a phone interview, dressing a certain way can give you confidence and put you in the right headspace.

    • Top:For video interviews, your interviewer is most likely only going to see your torso. Make sure that you are wearing a professional shirt that is wrinkle and stain free.

    • Best Colors To Wear: Look at these six common colors that individuals wear to interviews and what they convey.

    • Patterns: Avoid busy patterns for video interviews. They can be distracting, especially on camera.

  5. Interview Checklist: There are a lot of things that can go wrong during your interview. Identifying and taking care of them before time will take some of the stress away from the process.

    • Battery: Your computer, tablet, or phone should be fully charged. Have a charger at hand and conduct your interview while connected to a power source, if possible.

    • Be Early: Be five to ten minutes early. Make sure you have some time to breathe, relax, and make yourself comfortable before the interview starts. Double-check to see if things are working one last time before you start.

    • Eliminate Distractions:Silence your phone and turn all of your notifications off. Make sure that your pets and kids are occupied and will stay quiet throughout your interview.

    • Have Software Ready: Load the video platform that the interview is being conducted on ahead of time.

    • Outfit: Plan your outfit ahead of time.

  6. Video Interview Tips: Here are a few helpful tips for video interviews.

    • Eye Contact: Making eye contact does not necessarily mean that you have to look directly into the camera. Make sure that your eyes are focused on one thing. If you are looking at different parts of your screen, the interviewer will notice and might think you are uninterested or distracted. If you are choosing to focus on the interviewer, make sure that their image is close to the webcam. So if your webcam is in the middle center of your screen, do not have the interviewer in the bottom left corner.

    • Handwritten notes: Taking handwritten notes may seem a little strange since you are on your computer where taking notes is easier. However, your interviewer can hear you typing, which can be distracting. They also may think that you are doing something other than taking notes.

    • Interview Cheat Sheet: Interviewing on your computer gives you an automatic advantage. You get to have notes handy in case you need to reference them. However, you do not want to be scrolling through endless pages and have your eyes looking at different things. Instead, have a few key points in a document as a backup.

    • Webcam Placement: Make sure your computer is in a good position. Some computers have a built-in webcam on top of the screen and others on the bottom. If your camera is on the bottom, make sure that it is not angled strangely. External webcams often work best if you place them on the top of your screen in the very center.

  7. What If Something Goes Wrong: No matter how much you prepare, you cannot control everything that will happen. What if the internet cuts out, the power goes out, or your kid comes rushing in with an emergency?

    • Stay Calm: Do not panic. When you maintain your composure, you can think more clearly and act more rationally.

    • Look at it as an opportunity: Take advantage of the situation and use it to show the employer how you act under pressure and deal with problems when they arise.

    • Have a backup:Have backup plans in case your internet cuts out, or the power goes out. For example, you can use cellular data to email the interviewer if these things happen.

    • Apologize: Say you are sorry once and then move on. Your interviewer can sense if you are panicked or calm, and if you apologize profusely, again, and again, they might get annoyed.

  8. Tips For Landing the Job: Congratulations! You were invited to be interviewed. However, now you have to convince the interviewer that you are the right candidate for the job. Here are several tips to help you stand out from the competition. For additional information read through our great guide on how to prepare for an interview.

    • Accessibility: Make sure the employer knows that you are easy to reach. Highlight your communication skills. This starts with your first correspondence. It does not look good if it takes you several days to answer their email that invites you to be interviewed. Have notifications on so that you see emails right away.

    • Know about the company: Learn about the company’s mission statement. Knowing their aims and values will give you a better understanding of the company. During the interview, you can talk about how your interests and passions align with their mission and how you want to and will help them achieve their goals.

    • Review the job posting: Most job postings have a section that outlines what skills, qualities, and experience you need for the open position. Go through the highlighted attributes and make a list of them. You can categorize them into three sections: qualifications, responsibilities, and personal traits. These are things you should try to incorporate into your interview.

    • Self-Motivated: This is an important attribute to highlight. When you are working by yourself, you are your own supervisor. Give concrete examples of what you have accomplished on your own.

  9. Questions Your Interviewer May Ask Specific to Working at Home: Your interviewer is going to ask you several questions to determine if you are the right candidate for the job. Here are five specific questions targeted to work from home positions.

    • Have you worked at home previously? If you have great, this gives you an advantage. You can show that you are experienced and versed in dealing with the challenges of remote work. Talk about how you communicated effectively, especially with coworkers in different time zones. If you have not worked remotely, explain the attributes you have that would make you a good remote worker like being good with communication, organization, time management, self-motivation, and technology.

    • Do you have a home office? Where will you be working? Do not answer this question by saying that you do not have one. Instead, say that you have a designated space at home where you can work productively.

    • Are you a good communicator? Give examples. Give concrete examples of times where you excelled at communicating with others while working remotely. If you have never worked remotely, give examples of times that you communicated with others in your office or with remote clients.

    • What do you think your biggest challenge will be as a remote worker? How will you address it? Do not say that you will not have any challenges. Be honest. You can talk about staying focused, avoiding distractions, and staying motivated throughout the day. Once you address these obstacles, explain how you can overcome them.

    • How do you stay motivated?Explain the tools and strategies you use to stay focussed and get your work done. Maybe you make a handwritten list at the beginning of each day and cross off things as you go through them. Perhaps you installed software that blocks distracting applications and websites like Instagram and Facebook.

  10. Questions to Ask Your Interviewer: At the end of most interviews, your interviewer will ask if you have any questions for them. Having questions ready to ask shows that you have done your research and are interested in the position. Here are a few questions that you can ask.

    • Are employees in different time zones. If so, what does communication look like? How do you deal with the time differences?

    • Do you use a specific platform to communicate? Do you have virtual meetings? If so, how often?

    • Who would I report to? What does the communication between that person and me look like? How often will I get feedback?

    • Are work hours strict or flexible?

    • What does a successful remote worker look like at your company? How do you measure the success of your remote employees?

Devon Feuer
Devon Feuer
Author